2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    Feb 06, 2023  
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Journalism

  
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    JOUR 240 - Applied Journalism

    (1-3)
    Participation on the staff of the yearbook, student newspaper, or literary magazine in various areas, including writing and editing. Repeatable to six hours.

    Offered each semester.
  
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    JOUR 320 - Writing for Media

    (3)
    Primary focus of this course is on the fundamentals of newswriting and how writing for newspapers differs from that used in public relations and broadcasting.

    Prerequisite(s): JOUR 220; ENG 145.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
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    JOUR 332 - Desktop Publishing

    (3)
    Presents both theory and techniques in the development and layout of “camera-ready” laser-printed material by the use of micro-computers. The course uses micro-computer systems and desktop publishing software. Multiple designs and forms are developed by the student.

    Prerequisite(s): COMM 110 Some word processing experience recommended.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    JOUR 340 - Applied Journalism

    (1-3)
    Participation on the staff of the yearbook, student newspaper, or literary magazine in various areas, including writing and editing. Repeatable to six hours.

    Prerequisite(s): JOUR 220.

    Offered each semester.
  
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    JOUR 341 - Sports and Feature Writing

    (3)
    The focus is on writing both sports and feature stories, including human-interest articles and personality profiles. Students will learn how to select and develop these stories, with particular emphasis on follow-up and sidebar stories that enhance the reader’s understanding of the news.

    Prerequisite(s): JOUR 220; ENG 145.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
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    JOUR 373 - Photojournalism

    (3)
    This course explores how we tell stories using pictures in newspapers and magazines. It covers legal and ethical considerations, visual storytelling rooted in semiotic theory, and a healthy dose of practice-and-critique, hands-on photojournalism.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
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    JOUR 431 - Magazine and Nonfiction Writing

    (3)
    Practice in writing for consumer and special interest magazines. In addition, the course will address writing query letters, copyright law, finding an agent, manuscript preparation, securing a publisher, and selling an article.

    Prerequisite(s): JOUR 220; ENG 145.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
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    JOUR 471 - Editing

    (3)
    This course addresses the question, “What does it mean to be an editor?” Emphasis is placed on publication management, copyediting, headline writing, typography, layout, and design. The course also examines some ethical and legal issues editors face.

    Prerequisite(s): JOUR 220.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.

Management

MMP courses listed below are open only to students registered in the MMP program.

  
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    MMP 101 - Business Survey of Algebra

    (2)
    This course is designed to provide a stronger background in Algebra fundamentals in order to meet the MMP requirement. Topics include solving simultaneous equations, finding roots of quadratic equations, factoring polynomials, properties of exponents, slope of a line, graphing of linear functions, and summation notation.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 201 - Group and Organizational Behavior

    (3)
    A study of group behavior and how group functioning affects organizational effectiveness. Emphasis is placed on group decision making, conflict resolution, efficient and productive group management, and determining which tasks are best handled by groups or individuals.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 203 - Business Communications

    (3)
    An introduction to the business communication process with special attention given to building skills in public speaking, listening, small and large group presentations, and audio-visual usage. A review of the writing of business letters, memos, and brief reports is also included. (Presentations are required for classroom and online students. Online students will be provided several options from which to choose in order to fulfill the course requirements.)

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 304 - Principles of Management and Leadership

    (3)
    This course introduces students to the study of managerial and leadership practices. Components of the functional areas of management and development of leadership theories will be analyzed.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 305 - Research and Statistical Methods

    (3)
    Investigation methods, experiment design, and results evaluation techniques are presented. Application of statistical methods for the research project is covered with two experiment design options: hypothesis testing and measurement of objectives. Specific statistical information covered includes data display, central tendency and dispersion measures, probability, significance testing, and linear data correlation.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 308 - Management Control Systems

    (3)
    A review of the basics of financial accounting, financial statement ratio analysis, budgeting, and computer applications, for use in information analysis and decision making.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 323 - Introduction to Marketing

    (3)
    This course is the study of the basic concepts of marketing. It is designed to view marketing from the perspectives of the consumer and the company. Students will explore the concept of the marketing mix (the four Ps: product, price, promotion, and place) through text, lectures, and case studies. Course work will include understanding consumer buying behavior, ethical marketing practices, and diversity issues in marketing.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 325 - Marketing Management

    (3)
    This course is designed to delve into the management decision-making process of marketing. Students will explore targeting and segmenting of markets. Discussions of branding, services, product life cycles, and channel distribution options will be linked to a firm’s competitive strategies. Focus will also include marketing communications, advertising, and customer relationships. Students will learn to identify the criticisms of marketing, the impact of consumerism, and the role of ethics in marketing strategy.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 327 - Media Marketing

    (3)
    Beginning with an overview of electronic commerce, students will become familiar with the processes of eBusiness. From electronic storefronts to B2B commerce, supply chain and value chains will be explored. Strategies that take an organization from the “mortar to click” operation will be examined. Emphasis will be placed on the use of new and emerging media technologies as a strategic component of the marketing mix. Casework and field studies of successful eBusinesses will focus on comparing and contrasting consumer behavior, customer relationships, promoting and selling, eTransactions, and the legal and ethical issues in eBusiness compared to the traditional marketplace.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 329 - Sales and Marketing

    (3)
    The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the field of professional selling and its relationship to marketing. This course will develop the fundamental concepts of sales that students heading for a career in marketing must understand. The impact the organization’s sales function has on customer relationships will be addressed. Students will gain an understanding of the importance of ethics and Christian values in the world of professional selling.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 332 - Financial Management

    (3)
    A concise study and evaluation of finance performance, planning, and forecasting. The student will analyze the management of capital structures, cost of capital, and other related concepts.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 341 - Fundamentals of Project Management

    (3)
    This course introduces the project management framework, including the basic project management phases of initiating, planning, executing, and terminating. It defines what a project is and the importance of project management. It covers the history of project management and outlines basic project management terms and concepts. It focuses on the role of project management as a part of the strategic plan of an organization.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 342 - Scope and Time Management

    (3)
    This course focuses on developing the skills needed to by the Project Manager for scope and schedule management. Students will learn about the importance of developing a project program, organizational communication plans, and how project team dynamics are integral to managing project scope development including the human resources components of assembling a project team. Time management skill will include how to determine the critical path for a project, how to use mathematical analysis techniques, such as CPM and PERT, how to develop project schedules, how to incorporate project deliverables into a milestone schedule, how to monitor and manage that schedule and project processes for identifying and recovering from problem situations.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 345 - Cost and Risk Management

    (3)
    The course will focus on developing skills for establishing project cost models, managing costs and monitoring project cost impacts. The course will also include identifying, analyzing, and responding to risk throughout the project life cycle in order to minimize consequences of adverse events and maximize results of positive events. Identification and quantification of risks are critical to being able to develop and implement a risk management plan and include an analysis of the human resources constraints and assets required to execute the project.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 346 - Project Quality Management

    (3)
    The proficient applications of communication skills in an increasingly electronic realm of interaction in projects to achieve, monitor, and maintain quality management of a project is an emphasis of this course. This course will also develop skills in quality management that begin with identifying quality standards and expectations for a project, determining how those standards will be measured, and how the information captured can and should be used to assess performance and form the basis for corrective actions. The human relations component of the communication processes and project team integration for quality management is an integral part of this course.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 361 - Survey of Community Health

    (3)
    This course provides an overview of community health organizations and their infrastructures at the international, national, and local levels. Factors that influence the health of a community will be discussed including physiological, social, behavioral, and cultural influences. The dynamics associated with community organizing and the principles related to promoting and maintaining the health of the community will be explored. Details involving the necessary steps for effective community health program planning, implementation, and evaluation will be examined.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 363 - Fundamental Principles of Health Services in the United States

    (3)
    This course provides an in-depth study of healthcare systems. Content focuses on describing the related industry institutions, examining various providers, scrutinizing delivery including both the pros and the cons, and analyzing the myriad reimbursement practices. Additionally, the course will explore issues regarding the integration of healthcare policy, politics, and the legislative process in this country.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 364 - Legal Aspects of Healthcare Organizations and Management

    (3)
    The study of legal issues related to the health care delivery system in various settings such as managed care organizations, clinics, hospitals, home health care agencies, and emergency care facilities. This course will examine the law as it pertains to issues of informed consent, patient rights, hospital liability, and the delivery of health care services. Management topics including governing boards, medical staff appointments, and third-party reimbursement will also be explored.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 371 - Foundational Principles of Environmental Science

    (3)
    This course provides an introduction to the basic scientific principles governing ecosystems as they relate to the environmental consequences of resource development and industrial processes. The course will present an understanding of environmental science through exploration of basic principles in the natural, physical, and social sciences. Emphasis is placed on understanding how the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere function, and how these spheres interact with human consumption, production, and technological progress. This course will examine several of the natural sciences that influence the management of the earth’s environment.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 372 - Environmental Regulation, Policy, and Law

    (3)
    This course explores the structure, design, and components of various environmental regulations and application of the statutory and regulatory mandates fundamental to environmental management that compel design, planning, and daily operations at federal, non-federal, not-for-profit, and commercial job-sites. The course will focus on acquiring a basic knowledge of federal legislation. The course will include a survey of regulations and emphasize implementation at the practical level.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 374 - Environmental Conservation and Sustainability

    (3)
    This course will introduce students to current and future trends in resource conservation, policy, and sustainability. This course will address environmental economics, environmental innovation diffusion, resource sustainability, and the environmental impact of existing and emerging technologies. Topics will include source reduction, recovery, reuse, recycling, conservation, land use/reuse, material substitution, process modification, and waste minimization, with emphasis on pollution prevention, energy, and environmental sustainability techniques. Emphasis of this course is placed on the range of current and future environmental choices, and the role of energy choices in determining local environmental conditions and the global marketplace.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 403 - Strategic Quality Management

    (3)
    This course is designed to familiarize students with the conventional principles and methods associated with strategic quality management. The focus is on designing organizations that support a strategic quality focus, process management, and teamwork.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 404 - Project Management

    (3)
    The course is the study of basic project management principles and the project life cycle. The criteria for determining the success of a project is discussed. The course enables students to have an immediate impact on the successful completion of projects in which they are involved.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 405 - Corporate Strategy

    (3)
    This course is the capstone course of the project management concentration. The focus of the course is on how successful organizations design their strategy. Tools and techniques for strategy formulation are discussed. Case studies are used to support the student’s understanding of the importance of strategic decision making.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 406 - Human Resource/Personnel Management

    (3)
    An exploration of policies and practices regarding recruitment, selection, training, development, and compensation of employees including EEO and OSHA legislation.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 407 - Faith and Worldviews

    (3)
    An exploration of the major world views and a review of the rich resources of the Bible for creative personal faith and life in the modern world. An opportunity to integrate faith, learning, and living is the goal.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 409 - Personal Values and Business Ethics

    (3)
    This is a course designed to explore the intricacies of business and personal ethics. Ethical theories are applied to contemporary case studies about business and personal ethics problems. Corporate social responsibility is discussed and used to critically evaluate many organizations.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 410 - Capstone in Liberal Arts

    (4)
    This course presents and considers various works in art, literature, and music. The curriculum is organized thematically and historically to show how different artists, writers, and composers in different times have approached some major issues of humanity: Love, War, Death, Nature, Religion, and the Human Situation.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 441 - Problem Solving in Management – Part I

    (3)
    This course combines concepts and methods of problem solving within the context of the business setting, the community setting, and/or the non-profit organizational setting. The course covers principles of problem solving, emphasizes analytical thinking skills that ensure objectivity, and requires the development of critical thinking skills needed for the problem-solving process. Library research methods and resources are introduced to assist students in the development of this project. Additionally, the course serves as a tool to facilitate learning about successful management of a problem-solving team. Requires both written and oral presentation.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 442 - Problem Solving in Management – Part II

    (2)
    The continuation and completion of Problem Solving in Management - Part I (MMP 441). Requires both written and oral presentation.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 461 - Principles of Epidemiology

    (3)
    Epidemiology is considered the study of the distribution and determinants of health-related states in specified populations. This course provides an overview of the basic principles, terminology, and measures used in epidemiology and biostatistics. Fundamental characteristics of descriptive and analytical epidemiology will be reviewed as well as the steps necessary to conduct a critical analysis of an epidemiologic study. Details regarding how epidemiology guides public health planning and decision making, as well as associated ethical implications concerning human research, will be examined.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.
  
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    MMP 471 - Environmental Planning, Strategy, and Leadership

    (3)
    This course focuses on applying strategic management tools to incorporate considerations of environmental sustainability, conservation, and pollution control into leadership decision-making operations. Students will understand that some organizations incorporate environmentally sustainable practices because of an ethical conviction to do well for the environment; others are motivated by pressures from stakeholders to exploit environmental knowledge and experience for long-term sustainable advantage. This course will examine how organizations develop and implement environmental management strategies to promote efficient management and resource maximization. Leadership roles and responsibilities of strategic managers are examined and students learn how to apply the tools of strategic business management to the problems of environmental management.

    This course is open only to students registered in the MMP program.

Mathematics

  
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    MATH 112 - Fundamentals of Math

    (3)
    Covers the basics of mathematical skills and knowledge needed to proceed into further educational mathematics courses. This course will review and emphasize the prerequisite manipulative skills involved in basic arithmetic. It will also cover the basic knowledge of mathematics (such as exponents; square roots; Pythagorean Theorem; area, perimeter, and volume formulas) and mathematical terminology. (Required for Early Childhood, Middle Childhood, and Intervention Specialist licensure areas. This course is for students in areas of elementary education only.)

    Offered for the final time in Spring 2014.
  
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    MATH 125 - Introductory Algebra

    (3)
    Topics in sets, whole numbers, integers, rational and real numbers, linear equations and inequalities, and systems of equations. Grading is limited to A through C- and F. Open to all students; required for those with ACT Math score ≤ 17.

    Offered each semester.
  
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    MATH 130 - Intermediate Algebra

    (3)
    Topics in algebra such as quadratic equations, exponents, radicals, polynomial expressions, and rational expressions. Required for students with ACT Math score of 18-19 or upon successful completion of MATH 125.

    Offered each semester.
  
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    MATH 132 - Fundamental Mathematical Concepts

    (3)
    Designed to provide the prospective teacher with an understanding of fundamental arithmetic and algebraic concepts and basic problem-solving skills. Emphasis is placed upon a problem-solving approach which requires students to be active participants in the examination of numerical concepts typically covered in the K-9 curriculum. (Required for Middle Childhood Math Concentration.)

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 112 or proficiency.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
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    MATH 140 - Introduction to Statistics

    (3)
    An introduction to statistics with a primary focus on problem solving and statistical literacy. Designed to provide students with the conceptual foundation and quantitative skills needed to analyze and interpret data and to meaningfully interpret statistical results reported in research articles and in popular media. Includes topics such as the quantification of variables, sources of data, sampling procedures, graphical representation of data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, correlation and regression, confidence intervals, and significance tests.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 130 or equivalent proficiency.

    Cross-listed with PSYC 140.

    Offered each semester.
  
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    MATH 145 - Quantitative Reasoning

    (3)
    The purpose of this course is to develop critical thinking and quantitative reasoning skills. Topics of study will include logic and set theory, problem-solving techniques, number “sense,” an introduction to probability and statistics, graphs, and modular arithmetic. Applications of mathematics in other fields will be studied, including art (symmetry, perspective, patterns, golden mean and ratio), politics (voting methods, polling practices), and business (networks, scheduling, finance). Special emphasis will be placed on collaborative learning.

    Offered each semester.
  
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    MATH 150 - Precalculus

    (4)
    A rigorous study of the concepts of algebra and trigonometry as functions. Emphasis is on examining functions symbolically, numerically, graphically, and verbally. The course is designed to prepare students for MATH 201. Graphing calculator required; TI-83(/84) preferred.

    Prerequisite(s): ACT math score ≥ 20 (SAT-Math ≥ 500) or a grade of C- or higher in MATH 130.

    Offered each semester.
  
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    MATH 201 - Calculus I

    (5)
    A review of analytic geometry, functions, and graphs. Concept and definition of limit, techniques of finding limits, derivatives, differentials, implicit differentiation, Newton’s Method, applications including asymptotes and maxima/minima problems. Antiderivatives, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, definite integrals, indefinite integrals, change of variables and numerical integration. Trigonometric functions are incorporated throughout. Exponential and logarithmic functions are introduced.

    Prerequisite(s): Three years of high school college-preparatory mathematics and an ACT math score of 26 or higher; or a grade of C or higher in MATH 150.

    Offered each semester.
  
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    MATH 202 - Calculus II

    (5)
    Applications of the definite integral, solids of revolution, volumes by slicing, arc length, logarithmic and exponential functions, laws of growth and decay, inverse trigonometric functions, hyperbolic and inverse hyperbolic functions, integration by parts, partial fractions, trigonometric substitutions and other techniques of integration, indeterminate forms and improper integrals, infinite sequences and series, and an introduction to partial derivatives.

    Prerequisite(s): a grade of C- or higher in MATH 201 or proficiency.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    MATH 210 - Discrete Mathematics

    (3)
    A survey of discrete mathematical concepts. Topics will include sets, logic, relations, combinatorics, graph theory, trees, mathematical induction and Boolean Algebra.

    Offered each Spring.
  
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    MATH 215 - Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary Grades

    (3)
    This course focuses on the content, teaching and learning strategies, and resources for theory-driven mathematics instruction in grades K through 6 based on Ohio and NCTM standards. Strategies for effective intervention are also introduced. (Required of all Early Childhood Education and Intervention Specialist majors.) This course does not count toward the hours required for a major or minor in mathematics.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 232; Math proficiency (ACT Math score of 20 or successful completion of MATH 130).

    Offered each semester beginning Fall 2014.
  
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    MATH 241 - Concepts in Geometry and Measurement

    (3)
    Students will extend and expand their knowledge and understanding of both measurement and geometry. This will include an understanding of the attributes of length, capacity, weight and mass, area, volume, time, temperature, and angles and the constructing of formulas and procedures for determining these measures. Students will also explore transformation of geometric figures. This course does not count toward the hours required for a major or minor in mathematics.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 132 or permission of the instructor and the Department Chair.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    MATH 303 - Probability and Statistics I

    (3)
    Probability, use of tables and graphs, frequency distribution, correlation and related topics.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 201 or permission of the instructor.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    MATH 304 - Probability and Statistics II

    (3)
    A continuation of MATH 303 with an emphasis in application of sound statistical techniques for estimation, test of hypothesis, various linear and nonlinear regression models. The role of data analysis, probability, and decision making will be examined from a systems view.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 303.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    MATH 311 - Linear Algebra

    (3)
    An introductory course in the algebra and geometry of vectors, matrices, and linear transformations. Finite-dimensional vector spaces are presented with applications and examples of all topics covered.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 202 or permission of the instructor.

    Offered each Spring.
  
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    MATH 313 - Differential Equations

    (3)
    Differential equations of the first and second orders with their solutions and applications. Includes the use of the Laplace transforms, series solutions, and an introduction to partial differential equations.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 331 or permission of the instructor.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
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    MATH 331 - Multivariable Calculus

    (3)
    Concepts of modern real analysis, further application of partial differentiation and multiple integration, parametric equations, vector functions and fields, line and surface integrals, Green’s Theorem and Stokes’ Theorem.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 202.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    MATH 341 - Modern Geometry

    (3)
    Advanced topics of Euclidean geometry, including properties of axiomatic systems and introduction to non-Euclidean geometries.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 311 or permission of the instructor.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
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    MATH 343 - History of Mathematics

    (3)
    An introduction to the history of mathematics, particularly in relation to the development of topics through calculus. Designed to provide the student with an understanding of the interrelationship of the branches of mathematics study and to give enrichment material for the future teacher of mathematics.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 201 or permission of the instructor.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    MATH 352 - Number Theory

    (3)
    A study of properties of the integers including divisibility, primeness, congruences, factor theory, numeration systems, Diophantine problems and others.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 201.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    MATH 420 - Research

    (1-3)
    An investigation of a topic of the student’s choice in consultation with a faculty member.

    Enrollment by permission of the Department Chair.
  
  •  

    MATH 422 - Mathematical Modeling

    (3)
    This course emphasizes the scientific approach in decision making. A systems approach will be taken in the structuring of various mathematical models. Subjects to be covered include linear programming, network analysis, dynamic programming and other operations research-oriented techniques.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 303, 311.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    MATH 432 - Algebraic Structures

    (3)
    A study of the basic algebraic properties of groups, rings and fields and their extensions by the axiomatic approach.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 311.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    MATH 435 - Real Analysis

    (3)
    A study of real analysis topics including the topology of the real line and Rn, sequences and series, functions, continuity, uniform continuity, differentiation and theory of integration.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 331.

    Offered on demand.
  
  •  

    MATH 450 - Advanced Topics

    (1-3)
    Selected topics from any of the areas offered in mathematics. Open to students with advanced standing in mathematics.

    Enrollment by permission of the Department Chair.
  
  •  

    MATH 460 - Mathematics Seminar

    (1)
    A series of colloquia featuring mathematics faculty, mathematics students and guests as speakers. Students are expected to attend and participate in discussions and to prepare and present a seminar talk.

    Prerequisite(s): Acceptance as a mathematics major and Senior standing or permission of the instructor.

    Offered each Fall.

Media Communication

  
  •  

    MDCM 210 - Introduction to Media Convergence

    (3)
    This course investigates the role, principles, practices, and history of radio/television industries and other communication media technologies in the United States and around the world, while focusing upon contemporary trends of media convergence. Students will use the lens of convergence to understand traditional media structures and to develop new ways of thinking about roles and structures of the media industries.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    MDCM 240 - Applied Radio/Television

    (1-3)
    Participation on the University radio station and on television crews in various areas from script writing to editing, including a study of production technique and recent innovations in equipment and methodology. Repeatable to six hours.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    MDCM 320 - Editing

    (2)
    This course is a hands-on course that introduces the basic techniques and concepts of digital film and video editing. Students will learn to perform basic editing functions as a process of digital media production and storytelling.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    MDCM 321 - Electronic Publishing

    (3)
    This course will introduce students to the expanding field of interactive multimedia in CD ROM publishing, Computer Assisted Training, Web Site Development, and related ventures. Students will learn basic interactive media concepts, project development, and scripting to design presentations, training, educational, and entertainment materials. Also covered is the development and publishing of HTML-based Web pages and sites. Students will learn the basic skills of hypertext scripting and create a web site.

    Prerequisite(s): COMM 110.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    MDCM 331 - Media Production I

    (3)
    This course concentrates on the fundamental principles and practices of media project design and development. Students will learn production techniques used in the visual communication process including camera operations, imaging, lighting, and conveying messages in a visual environment. They will explore project development, project management, aesthetic design, and critique.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    MDCM 340 - Applied Radio/Television

    (1-3)
    Participation on the University radio station and on television crews in various areas from script writing to editing, including a study of production technique and recent innovations in equipment and methodology. Repeatable to six hours.

    Offered each semester.
  
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    MDCM 424 - History and Theory of Film

    (3)
    This course will explore the historical development of cinematic conventions and the theories that critics and film makers have developed to explain, provoke, and alter those conventions. Students will view films and read essays about film the course examines the ways that cinematic technologies and devices have shaped the stories, themes, industries, and audiences that permeate contemporary film.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    MDCM 431 - Media Production II

    (3)
    The course will build on the foundation of knowledge from MDCM 331 as students implement more advanced industry standard production techniques and as they produce news programs, documentaries, short films, or various projects for clients. Media technologies and production techniques provide an abundance of ways to tell and interpret stories, themes, or content. Students will determine which of these tools and techniques will enable them to communicate their messages most effectively. The course will also develop students’ understanding of project leadership and management through lab and actual experiences.

    Offered each Fall.

Music

  
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    MUS 121 - Music Theory Fundamentals

    (3)
    A preparatory music theory course including the fundamentals of pitch and rhythm notation, major and minor scales and key signatures, and beginning chords. Beginning sight singing, rhythm reading, and ear training are included. The course is a preparation for Music Theory I. This course does not count toward any of the degrees in Music.

    Prerequisite(s): None.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    MUS 131 - Keyboard Fundamentals

    (1)
    An introductory class instruction in basic keyboard skills for music majors and minors. Includes notation, rhythm keyboard technique, beginning piano literature, and sight-reading.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    MUS 141 - Voice Class

    (1)
    This course is designed to teach the basics of vocal production. Along with this, the student will learn basic music reading skills and general music concepts. This course is intended for students who wish to take Applied Voice but require rudimentary instruction necessary for applied study.

    Prerequisite(s): None.

    Offered at department discretion.
  
  •  

    MUS 153 - Keyboard Harmony I

    (1)
    This course is designed to assist the student in the development of the necessary keyboard skills required for the successful completion of the keyboard proficiency exam.

    Prerequisite(s): MUS 121 or minimum score on theory placement test, and 131 or proficiency. Co-requisite(s): MUS 155, 165 (for majors in music, music education, music ministry, and music production)

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    MUS 154 - Keyboard Harmony II

    (1)
    Continued preparation for developing the necessary keyboard skills required for successful completion of the keyboard proficiency exam.

    Prerequisite(s): MUS 153.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    MUS 155 - Music Theory I

    (2)
    Beginning music theory including scales, key signatures, meter, intervals, triads, basic melodic construction, beginning Roman numeral analysis, and cadences.

    Prerequisite(s): MUS 121 or minimum score on theory placement test, and 131 or proficiency. Co-requisite(s): MUS 153, 165 (for majors in music, music education, music ministry, and music production)

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    MUS 156 - Music Theory II

    (2)
    A continuation of Music Theory I, including seventh chords, inversions, figured bass, non-harmonic tones, harmonization, part writing, advanced melodic analysis, secondary functions, and modulations.

    Prerequisite(s): MUS 155.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    MUS 165 - Aural Skills I

    (1)
    Beginning sight singing and ear training using diatonic materials; 2:1 and 4:1 rhythms, dotted rhythms, and ties in simple and compound meters; and error detection in single voice examples.

    Prerequisite(s): MUS 121 or minimum score on theory placement test. Co-requisite(s): MUS 153, 155 (for majors in music, music education, music ministry, and music production)

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    MUS 166 - Aural Skills II

    (1)
    Intermediate sight singing and ear training including decorative chromaticism and altered scale degrees, alto and tenor clefs, rhythms employing triplets and duplets, syncopations, and quintuple meters. Also included are melodic transcriptions, diatonic chord progressions including inversions, and error detection two-voice examples.

    Prerequisite(s): MUS 165.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    MUS 210 - Vocal Ensembles

    (½)


    Vocal ensemble participation is open to all Malone University students having an appropriate musical background. Opportunities are available to perform on campus and in the community. Regular attendance is required. Specific descriptions follow.

    Chorale is a choir of mixed voices selected by audition. The Chorale performs a variety of choral literature from all style periods. Outside performance expectations include a spring tour and concerts in local churches. Offered each semester.

    Women’s Concert Choir is a choir of women’s voices selected by audition. The choir performs a wide range of sacred and secular women’s choral music. Offered each semester.

    Chamber Choir is a small mixed group of voices selected by audition. Chamber Choir performs a variety of musical styles both sacred and secular. Concurrent enrollment in Malone Chorale or Women’s Concert Choir is required. Offered each semester.

    Chapel Choir provides a choral opportunity for any student wishing to participate in campus chapel services. No audition is required for membership. Repertoire for this course will consist of a wide variety of sacred literature. No outside performances will be required. Offered at department discretion.

  
  •  

    MUS 211 - String Methods

    (1)
    Laboratory experience in pedagogical techniques as well as beginning through intermediate level performance techniques.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    MUS 212 - Percussion Methods

    (1)
    Laboratory experience in pedagogical techniques as well as beginning through intermediate level performance techniques.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    MUS 220 - Instrumental Ensembles

    (½)


    Instrumental ensemble participation is open to all Malone University students having an appropriate musical background. Opportunities are available to perform on campus and in the community. Regular attendance is required. Specific descriptions follow.

    Brass Ensemble is a flexible ensemble consisting of brass instruments. A variety of works from the literature is studied based on the proficiency of the participants. Offered at department discretion.

    Flute Ensemble studies and performs a variety of works from the literature based on the proficiency of the participants. Flutists selected by audition. Offered each semester.

    Jazz Band rehearses and performs various styles of jazz from music of the big band era to contemporary jazz. Smaller groups can be organized from the larger group according to need and availability. Audition is required. Offered each semester.

    Marching Band is an ensemble of woodwinds, brass and percussion that performs contemporary and traditional repertoire. The Marching Band performs at home football games, selected away games, and exhibitions. The band also performs for the Christmas concert at the end of the semester. Audition is required. Regular attendance for the entire semester is required. Required of instrumental music majors. Offered each Fall.

    Piano Ensemble studies and performs piano duet (four hand) and piano duo (two piano) repertoire in a wide variety of styles including classical, pop, and sacred. Prerequisite: 200 level in piano. Offered at department discretion.

    String Ensemble is a flexible ensemble of string instruments also utilizing woodwinds, brass and percussion as needed. A variety of works from the literature is studied based on the proficiency of the participants. Offered at department discretion. 

    Symphonic Band is a concert band consisting of woodwinds, brass, and percussion. The Symphonic Band performs a wide variety of traditional and contemporary wind band music. Audition for participation is required. Offered each semester.

    Wind Ensemble is an ensemble of woodwinds, brass, and percussion selected by audition. The Wind Ensemble performs more difficult traditional and contemporary wind band music. Offered at department discretion.

    Woodwind Ensemble is a flexible ensemble of woodwind instruments and french horn. A variety of works from the literature is studied based on the proficiency of the participants. Offered at department discretion.

  
  •  

    MUS 222 - Brass Methods

    (1)
    Laboratory experience in pedagogical techniques as well as beginning through intermediate level performance techniques.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    MUS 231 - Woodwind Methods

    (1)
    Laboratory experience in pedagogical techniques as well as beginning through intermediate level performance techniques.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    MUS 253 - Keyboard Harmony III

    (1)
    Final preparation for the completion of the keyboard proficiency exam.

    Prerequisite(s): MUS 154.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    MUS 255 - Music Theory III

    (2)
    A study of chromatic harmony and twentieth century techniques. Emphasis will be on a thorough analysis of complete shorter-to medium length compositions.

    Prerequisite(s): MUS 156.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    MUS 261 - Choral Conducting

    (2)
    Basic conducting technique is developed in a laboratory setting for practical application with choral ensembles. Enrollment by permission of department chair.

    Prerequisites or co-requisites: MUS 154, 156, 166.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    MUS 262 - Instrumental Conducting

    (2)
    Basic conducting and baton technique are developed in a laboratory setting for practical application in instrumental conducting. Includes the study of elements of instrumentation, score study, and transposition as they apply to instrumental conducting. Enrollment by permission of department chair.

    Prerequisite or Co-requisite: MUS 261.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    MUS 265 - Aural Skills III

    (1)
    Advanced sight singing and ear training including chromatic melodies, irregular meters, changing meters, jazz syncopations, transcriptions of popular idiom songs, and error detection three-voice examples.

    Prerequisite(s): MUS 166.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    MUS 271 - Diction I

    (1)
    This course is designed to introduce the student to the International Phonetics Alphabet (IPA) and its applications for the singer and choral conductor with particular regard to the English and Italian languages. While not intended as a substitute for proper study of a language, this course is designed to aid the student in producing clarity, accuracy, ease, and uniformity in the singing of these languages. This course is particularly helpful for the pre-service teacher to develop expertise needed for advanced choral and vocal instruction at the high school level.

    Offered at department discretion.
  
  •  

    MUS 273 - Diction II

    (1)
    A continuation of Diction I, with particular regard to the German and French languages.

    Prerequisite(s): MUS 271.

    Offered at department discretion.
  
  •  

    MUS 310 - Musical Instrument Repair

    (2)
    This course is designed to provide the pre-service teacher with the opportunity to learn proper repair and maintenance of wind and percussion instruments appropriate for the school band director.

    Offered at department discretion.
  
  •  

    MUS 322 - Band Methods

    (2)
    This course is designed to prepare the pre-service teacher to direct concert, marching, jazz, and other school band organizations. Emphasis will focus on rehearsal techniques, programming, fund raising, and administrative issues for beginning, intermediate, and advanced ensembles. Field experience is included.

    Prerequisite(s): MUS 262 or permission of department chair.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    MUS 324 - Band Literature

    (2)
    Study of band literature for elementary, middle school, high school, and college instrumental ensembles. Areas covered include the criteria for selection of music, understanding various systems of difficulty ratings, aesthetic concerns in the selection of music, concert programming to achieve aesthetic performances, developing appropriate lesson plans utilizing concepts within band music, and contemporary educational techniques and their use of band music as a means to educational goals.

    Prerequisite(s): MUS 322.

    Offered at department discretion.
  
  •  

    MUS 330 - Hymnology

    (2)
    A study of the origins and development of the Christian hymn and the part it plays in Christian worship. The materials presented will acquaint the student with the scope of Christian hymnody, its historical patterns, the environment from which it emerged, the contribution of significant individuals, and specific collections of hymns and tunes.

    Offered at department discretion.
 

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