2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    Feb 06, 2023  
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Biology

  
  •  

    BIOL 420 - Research

    (1-4)
    A laboratory investigation of a topic of the student’s choice in consultation with a faculty member.

    Enrollment by permission of the Department Chair.
  
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    BIOL 430 - Biology Internship

    (1-4)
    This course is designed to provide the student with a practical hands-on experience in biology.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 144, 145.

    Enrollment by permission of Department Chair.
  
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    BIOL 450 - Advanced Topics

    (1-4)
    Selected topics from any of the areas offered in biology. Open to students with advanced standing in biology.

    Enrollment by permission of the Department Chair.
  
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    BIOL 460 - Seminar

    (2)
    Literature topics selected and presented in seminar format; biology journal writing format taught.

    Enrollment by permission of the Department Chair.
  
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    BIOL 472 - Cell Biology

    (4)
    The study of the biology of cells including organization, ultrastructure, energy interrelationships, genetic expression, and immune system. Includes one 3-hour lab per week.

    Prerequisite(s): Advanced standing in biology or permission of the instructor.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.

Business Administration

  
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    BUS 112 - Fundamental Computer Applications

    (2)
    This course is designed to expose students to sufficient computing to become effective computer users. Using popular software packages (e.g., Microsoft Office), the emphasis will be on general and personal applications of the computer.

    Offered each Fall.
  
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    BUS 200 - Personal Finance

    (2)
    A course that provides an examination of financial decision making, with an emphasis on Christian stewardship, for the individual or family. Topics covered will include charitable giving, use of debt financing, investment and savings options, budgeting, insurance, and estate planning.

    Offered at department discretion.
  
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    BUS 220 - Introduction to Business

    (3)
    This course will examine the social, political, and economic impact of business in American Society. It will also survey the various functions of a business such as marketing, operations, accounting, finance, etc.

    Offered each Fall.
  
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    BUS 240 - Statistics for Business

    (3)
    A study of basic statistics concepts including measures of central tendency, variance, testing experimental hypotheses, correlation, and regression analysis. Emphasis is placed on business applications such as market research, quality control, inventory control, estimation of account balances, etc. This course meets the quantitative reasoning requirement of the general education program.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 130 or equivalent proficiency.

    Offered each semester.
  
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    BUS 301 - Management of Sport

    (3)
    The nature of management is examined from a theoretical and practical perspective in a variety of sports settings. Managerial functions and skills are the focus of study and students will examine career opportunities, field experiences, human resource management, policy issues, facilities, marketing, economics, and finance of sport.

    Cross-listed with SMGT 301.

    Offered each Spring.
  
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    BUS 302 - Business Law

    (3)
    An introductory study of the different kinds of law and the legal environment in which businesses operate. Includes contracts, agency, negotiable instruments, anti-trust, business organization, and labor- management relations.

    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or permission of the instructor.

    Offered each semester.
  
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    BUS 311 - Marketing

    (3)
    A study of the methods of distributing products through manufacturer, wholesaler, jobber, and retail outlet.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 202 or permission of the instructor; BUS 240 or MATH/PSYC 140.

    Offered each semester.
  
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    BUS 330 - Christian Ethics: Implications and Applications in Business

    (3)
    A course designed to explore the intricacies of business ethics through study of the basic philosophical theories of ethics and application of these theories to current case studies of business ethics problems.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing.

    Offered each semester.
  
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    BUS 332 - Business Finance

    (3)
    A study of methods of financing both small and large businesses through short-term and long-term financing; includes working capital management, corporation finance, and problems relative to financing different sizes of business.

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 211 or permission of the instructor; BUS 240 or MATH/PSYC 140.

    Offered each semester.
  
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    BUS 337 - Management Science

    (3)
    This course examines the development and application of quantitative models to assist in managerial decisions. Topics include resource allocation, waiting lines, scheduling, and transportation. Both optimization and heuristic models will be considered.

    Prerequisite(s): BUS 240 or MATH/PSYC 140 (BUS 423 is recommended).

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
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    BUS 342 - Management Principles

    (3)
    A course in the fundamentals of management. Management principles and techniques will be examined through the use of cases, films, guest lecturers, and individual student contact with practitioners in the field.

    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or permission of the instructor.

    Offered each semester.
  
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    BUS 361 - International Business

    (3)
    A course which provides the student with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the global marketplace and the nature of international competition. Topics such as marketing, finance, and management are considered through the use of case studies, outside speakers, and field trips. In addition, culture, governmental impacts, and the nature of the multi-national organization are considered.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 202, 203; Junior standing.

    Offered each semester.
  
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    BUS 371 - Management of Information Systems

    (3)
    This course examines the nature of information technology and its dynamic functions in organizations. Through applications of basic software tools (e.g., database technology, decision support systems), case studies, and examinations of relevant theory (e.g., reengineering), the student is able to develop a cohesive view of the management of information systems in today’s organizations.

    Prerequisite(s): BUS 240 or MATH/PSYC 140; ability to use spreadsheet software (e.g., Microsoft Excel).

    Cross-listed with ACCT 371.

    Offered each semester.
  
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    BUS 380 - Entrepreneurship and the American Enterprise System

    (3)
    This course will focus on the role of entrepreneurship in the American enterprise system. Entrepreneurship should be considered to be more than just starting a business. The perspective of this class will be to view entrepreneurship as a process that adds economic and social value to society. The economic and societal value of government involvement and regulation will also be considered. Students will participate in activities that illustrate the entrepreneurship process.

    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or higher.

    Cross-listed with ECON 380.

    Offered each Fall.
  
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    BUS 390 - Investments

    (3)
    This course examines how portfolio investments and speculative decisions can be made. It includes a discussion of institutions in the investment community, an analysis of investment theory, and presentations of the practical implications of investment theory. This course is strongly recommended for students intending to go to graduate school.

    Prerequisite(s): BUS 332.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
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    BUS 415 - Consumer Behavior

    (3)
    Introduction to the study and analysis of the decision-making processes and behaviors consumers use in satisfying needs and wants in relation to the marketing environment shaped by marketing practices of organizations. Focus is from the viewpoint of the marketing manager and what he/she needs to know in order to be more effective in meeting consumer needs.

    Prerequisite(s): BUS 311.

    Offered each Fall.
  
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    BUS 417 - Marketing Management and Strategy

    (3)
    Marketing from the viewpoint of the marketing manager. Focus is on strategic planning in marketing. The course will examine strategic marketing problems, as well as functional marketing problems faced by enterprises.

    Prerequisite(s): BUS 311.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
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    BUS 419 - Sales Management

    (3)
    This course is concerned specifically with the management of an outside sales force and its activities. It includes the nature of personal selling; relationship selling; team selling; strategic planning at the sales force level and the marketing level; organizing, staffing, and training a sales force; directing sales force operations; sales planning; and evaluating sales performance. This course is strongly recommended for students who intend to have careers in the area of sales management.

    Prerequisite(s): BUS 311.

    Offered each Spring.
  
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    BUS 422 - Human Resource Management

    (3)
    A study of human resource management and its role in the public and private sectors. Includes recruitment, selection, placement, training, compensation, safety, health, and employment planning.

    Prerequisite(s): BUS 342.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
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    BUS 423 - Operations Management

    (3)
    A study of strategic and tactical decisions related to the design and management of operations in both manufacturing and service organizations. (The professor may choose to focus only on the service environment in some semesters.) Some of the topics to be included are quality management, forecasting, facilities location and layout, inventory management, and tools and techniques for decision making.

    Prerequisite(s): BUS 240 or MATH/PSYC 140; BUS 342.

    Offered each semester.
  
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    BUS 433 - International Finance

    (3)
    This course gives the student an understanding of international business finance. Topics to be considered are the international monetary system, foreign exchange markets, foreign investment decisions, international financial markets, international banking, and import and export financing.

    Prerequisite(s): BUS 332.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
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    BUS 436 - Short-term Financial Management

    (3)
    This course covers how to make decisions about cash and liquidity positions, credit extension and collections, payables, bank relations, short-term investing and borrowing, managing interest rate and foreign exchange risks, and developing near-term financial plans. Each of these issues is addressed with analytical routines, valuation analysis, and description and evaluation of current business practices. Financial spreadsheet modeling provides hands-on, usable skills.

    Prerequisite(s): BUS 332.

    Offered each Spring.
  
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    BUS 442 - Sport Marketing

    (3)
    This course will examine the historical development, current practices, and future trends of marketing sport. An analysis of key marketing strategies and concepts will be studied from a sport manager’s perspective. Topics include promotions and public relations, sport consumer behavior, strategic market planning, marketing information management, marketing communications, and sponsorship.

    Prerequisite(s): BUS 311 or permission of the instructor.

    Cross-listed with SMGT 442.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
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    BUS 443 - Organizational Behavior

    (3)
    This course will focus upon analysis of situations involving individual, group, and organizational behavior. Major topics will include small and large group theory, interpersonal relations, organizational culture, and achievement of the goals of the enterprise with and through people as individuals and groups. Areas of investigation include communication, motivation, leadership, and predicting and explaining human behavior within organizations.

    Prerequisite(s): BUS 342.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
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    BUS 450 - Advanced Topics

    (1-3)
    An opportunity for the superior student to pursue, under supervision, an area of special interest either on his/her own initiative or in a seminar group. Open to juniors or seniors who are majors in the area and who have completed or are taking regularly scheduled courses.

    Enrollment by permission of the Department Chair.
  
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    BUS 453 - Strategic Management

    (3)
    This course examines strategy formulation, implementation, and evaluation in both for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. It serves as a capstone course for the Business Administration major in which students should integrate the knowledge learned in the core business curriculum.

    Prerequisite(s): BUS 302, 311, 330, 332, 342, and ACCT/BUS 371.

    Prerequisites or co-requisites: BUS 361, 423.

    Offered each semester.

Chemistry

  
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    CHEM 104 - Uses of Chemistry in Society

    (4)
    This is a basic chemistry course designed to develop an understanding of the history, philosophy, and major theories of chemistry and how this material relates to global issues such as air and water pollution, acid rain, ozone depletion, global warming, nutrition, drugs, alternative energy, and genetic engineering. This course meets the laboratory science General Education requirement for students not majoring in science or related fields of study. It does not fulfill the science requirements for any Malone major or minor. Includes one 2-hour lab per week.

    Offered each Spring.
  
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    CHEM 115 - Basic Physiological Chemistry

    (4)
    A presentation of inorganic, organic, and biochemical principles with emphasis on application to living systems. Topics include, but are not limited to, electrolyte balance, water balance, gas laws and respiratory gases, acid-base balance, metabolic pathways, structure and function of hormones, drugs, and enzymes. Intended for nonscience majors. Especially suitable for Nursing majors. May be used to fulfill the general education science requirement. Includes one 2-hour lab per week.

    Prerequisite(s): High school science and algebra recommended.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    CHEM 131 - General Chemistry I

    (4)
    A non-calculus-based introduction to the fundamentals of modern chemical practice; nuclear, electronic, and physical structure of matter; periodicity of the elements; dynamics of chemical reactions and equilibria. Includes one 3-hour lab per week.

    Prerequisite(s): Two years high school algebra or MATH 130.

    Offered each Fall.
  
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    CHEM 132 - General Chemistry II

    (4)
    Introduction to chemical kinetics, electrochemistry, application of thermodynamics to chemical systems, coordination compounds, and qualitative analysis. Includes one 3-hour lab per week.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 131 or equivalent.

    Offered each Spring.
  
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    CHEM 201 - Stewardship and Safety in Chemical Practice

    (2)
    A course designed to familiarize students with the OSHA Laboratory Standard and NFPA, ANSI, and NIOSH guidelines and regulations pertaining to safety in chemical laboratories. Specific topics include proper labeling; maintaining chemical inventories; acquiring, dispensing, and disposing of chemicals; spill cleanup; safety equipment monitoring; and prudent practices. Specific attention will be given to minimizing the health risks associated with careers in chemistry and the environmental impact of chemical use and disposal.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 132.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
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    CHEM 221 - Organic Chemistry I

    (4)
    A survey of the basic structure, nomenclature, reactivity, and practical importance of carbon compounds. Includes one 3-hour lab per week.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 132 or equivalent.

    Offered each Fall.
  
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    CHEM 312 - Inorganic Chemistry

    (4)
    Theories relating to atomic structure, chemical bonding, acid-base concepts, and coordination chemistry. Includes organometallic chemistry and study of main group elements. Includes one 3- hour lab per week.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 221 or permission of instructor.

    Offered at department discretion.
  
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    CHEM 322 - Organic Chemistry II

    (4)
    A survey of reactions, syntheses and qualitative tests for the various groupings of atoms displayed in carbon compounds. Includes one 3-hour lab per week.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 221 or equivalent.

    Offered each Spring.
  
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    CHEM 335 - Analytical Chemistry

    (4)
    Theory and application of gravimetric and volumetric quantitative analyses, with special emphasis on laboratory techniques, supplemented with contemporary instrumental techniques including UV, visible, IR, Fluorescence and NMR Spectroscopy. Includes two 3-hour labs per week.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 221 or permission of instructor.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
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    CHEM 336 - Environmental Chemistry

    (4)
    A course designed to study the chemistry of the environment, the impact of the chemicals on the environment, and management of these effects. Topics include chemical composition of earth, water and atmosphere, the ozone layer, acid rain, water supply, water purification, toxic waste, industrial energy waste, nuclear energy waste, and greenhouse effect. Includes one 3-hour lab per week.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 132.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
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    CHEM 374 - Biochemistry I

    (4)
    Course content includes study of structure and importance of water to biological systems; bioenergetics; pH, physiological buffers; acid-base balance, structure, and functions of molecules of life (carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids); enzyme kinetics; and metabolic pathways. Includes one 3-hour lab per week.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 132.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
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    CHEM 375 - Biochemistry II

    (4)
    Topics of study include but are not limited to nucleic acid structure, information transfer, protein synthesis, and signal transduction. Includes one 2-hour lab per week.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 144 and CHEM 132; or CHEM 374.

    Cross-listed with BIOL 375.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
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    CHEM 401 - Physical Chemistry I

    (4)


    This course is a study of the underlying theories of thermodynamics and reaction kinetics and their applications to physical and chemical systems such as phase equilibria, chemical equilibria, gases, solids, and solutions.

      Includes one 3-hour lab per week.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 221; MATH 202 or permission of instructor; PHYS 212.

    Cross-listed with PHYS 401.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.

  
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    CHEM 403 - Physical Chemistry II

    (3)
    This course is a study of introductory quantum mechanics, electronic structure of atoms, molecular structure and bonding, spectroscopy, and statistical thermodynamics.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 401.

    Cross-listed with PHYS 403.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
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    CHEM 411 - Computation and Visualization in Chemistry

    (3)
    This course is designed for students who are interested in pursuing careers in chemistry, biology, medicine, biotechnology, and computer science. The class will touch on advanced topics such as molecular mechanics and quantum chemistry. Students will learn to use computational chemistry, molecular modeling, and simulation and visualization software. Includes one 2-hour lab per week.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 401 or permission of instructor.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
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    CHEM 420 - Research

    (1-4)
    Topics of special interest to upper level chemistry majors such as organic structural analysis, organometallic or macromolecular chemistry.

    Enrollment by permission of the Department Chair.
  
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    CHEM 430 - Chemistry Internship

    (1-4)
    This course is designed to provide the student with a practical hands-on experience in chemistry.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 132.

    Enrollment by permission of the Department Chair. Some internship locations (e.g., Canton-Stark County Crime Lab) require immunizations that need to begin at least 6 months prior to the internship. Students considering internships should consult their advisers at least two semesters prior to the intended internships.
  
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    CHEM 431 - Forensic Chemistry

    (4)
    This course acquaints the student with the types of crime scene evidence that are useful to forensic chemists and the physical/chemical techniques used to analyze this evidence. The types of crime scene evidence discussed in this course include drugs, alcohol, arson residue, gunshot residue, and glass fragments. Presumptive and confirmatory tests for scheduled drugs and quantitation of their biological metabolites are also examined. The analytical techniques of gas chromatography, infrared spectrophotometry, and mass spectrometry are studied in the context of their utility in forensics. Includes one 3-hour lab per week.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 322.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
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    CHEM 450 - Advanced Topics

    (0.5-3)
    Selected topics from any of the areas offered in chemistry. Open to students with advanced standing in chemistry.

    Enrollment by permission of the Department Chair.
  
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    CHEM 460 - Writing and Presenting in Chemistry

    (2)
    Students learn literature researching techniques, American Chemical Society journal writing format, and attend and present seminars. Open to junior and senior chemistry majors.

    Offered each Spring.

Communication Arts

  
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    COMM 110 - Communication Skills

    (3)
    An introduction to the elements of the communication process in its personal and social aspects with special attention given to skill building in public speaking and group process. Writing skills will be emphasized through specific assignments.

    Offered each semester.
  
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    COMM 220 - Oral Interpretation

    (3)
    Understanding, appreciating, and interpreting for public performance of prose, poetry, and drama, together with the training of the vocal mechanism for optimum expressiveness.

    Prerequisite(s): COMM 110.

    Offered each Spring.
  
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    COMM 230 - Mass Media and Society

    (3)
    This course covers the history and development of mass media and their effects on the economic, social, and political aspects of American culture. It includes a survey of new technologies and how these media interact and/or reinforce each other. Students will develop a critical perspective of cultural values, attitudes, and ethics in mass media industries. Awareness of current events and access to media forms will be integral parts of the course.

    Prerequisite(s): COMM 110.

    Offered each semester.
  
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    COMM 270 - World Cinema

    (3)
    Students will view and analyze western and non-western movies, taking narrative cinema as the principal conduit into the lives, times, and cultures of other persons. As a foundation for film studies, we will explore the artistic and technical components of the cinema: narrative, mise en scène, cinematography, editing, and so on. Through this engagement with world cinema, the course will underline the connection between analyzing our experiences of film and a richer, more sophisticated enjoyment of it.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 145.

    Cross-listed with ENG 270.

    Offered each Spring.
  
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    COMM 312 - Communication Theory

    (3)
    An overview of the history of the field of communication and the predominant theories which guide scholarship. Students will develop a working knowledge of theories that explain a wide range of communication phenomena, explore applications of those theories and examine the relationships among different theoretical positions.

    Prerequisite(s): COMM 110; junior or senior standing.

    Offered each Fall.
  
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    COMM 320 - Theory and Practice of Groups

    (3)
    This course is intended to provide students with a basic understanding of how groups function and to explore the application of his understanding to everyday situations. The nature of the course is experiential and is designed to give students the opportunity to apply knowledge of concepts such as group goals, norms, roles, functions, and decision making to the processes functioning within groups.

    Prerequisite(s): COMM 110.

    Offered each semester.
  
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    COMM 330 - Scenography

    (3)
    An introduction to the design theory, techniques, materials and processes employed in scene and lighting design with consideration to theatre styles. Experience in creating elevations, ground plans, scaled models, light plots, and renderings. These techniques can also be applied to television production.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
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    COMM 332 - Media Law

    (3)
    A study of the federal and state laws governing print and electronic media, beginning with English common law, continuing through United States constitutional law, and concluding with recent Supreme Court rulings involving the media. Students will be assigned case studies for analysis and evaluation. Required of all students who choose journalism or media communication concentrations.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    COMM 360 - Directing

    (3)
    Laboratory training in the basic techniques of directing for the stage including rehearsals, scheduling, production management, and working with actors and technicians. These techniques can also be applied to television.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
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    COMM 410 - Persuasion

    (3)
    This course is a survey of rhetorical and psychological theories of persuasion. Students are prepared to critically consume and produce persuasive messages. Frameworks for ethical persuasion are developed.

    Prerequisite(s): COMM 110.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    COMM 420 - Research Methods

    (3)
    This course introduces students to examples and practice of research in communication including critical, quantitative, and qualitative methods of investigation. Students will write research questions, select methodology, collect data, analyze data, and present results.

    Prerequisite(s): COMM 110, 312; MATH/PSYC 140.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    COMM 430 - Internship

    (3)
    Practical, off-campus experience in Communication Studies, Journalism, Media Communication, Public Relations, or Theatre. May be repeated once.

    Prerequisite(s): COMM 360 or MDCM 331; JOUR 320 or PREL 330 or CMST 330, 332 or THEA 320.

    Offered each semester. Enrollment is limited to students who have a signed contract (see department chair for contract). Signatures of the internship supervisor and the department chair are required.
  
  •  

    COMM 442 - Intercultural Communication

    (3)
    In this course students will identify and explore the relationship between communication and culture. An emphasis will be placed on factors that affect the quality and processes of communication between persons of different cultures and co-cultures. Students will consider various theories and practices regarding issues of intercultural communication.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    COMM 450 - Advanced Topics

    (1-3)
    Individual or small group study. Open only to junior or senior majors in this area who have completed or are taking regularly scheduled courses. Selected topics from areas in communication, such as media ethics, television, and Christian drama workshops.

    Enrollment by permission of the Department Chair.
  
  •  

    COMM 460 - Senior Capstone

    (3)
    This seminar course is one method of summative evaluation of the major and of a communication student’s overall University experience. It is designed to integrate learning in a number of different areas by examining significant issues of communication in contexts of work, culture, and media.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing.

    Offered each Spring.

Communication Studies

  
  •  

    CMST 230 - Argumentation

    (3)
    This course examines the philosophy, structure, theory and practice of argumentation and includes the principles and skills of invention, analysis, evidence, observation, and inference. Students will learn principles of reasoning by debating significant issues.

    Prerequisite(s): COMM 110.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    CMST 330 - Interpersonal Communication

    (3)
    An introduction to interpersonal communication with a focus on the foundations and process of this area of communication and the development, change or improvement of interpersonal communication competencies and skills. Experiential in nature, the course focuses on the integration of theory, experience, and application to areas such as friendship, intimate and family relationships, inter-cultural communication, and communication in the workplace.

    Prerequisite(s): COMM 110.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    CMST 332 - Organizational Communication

    (3)
    This course offers the application of communication theory to organizational settings. Leadership, mentorship and organizational culture are specific topics of focus. Students will study the communication structures of the communication patterns of a local organizational setting.

    Prerequisite(s): COMM 110.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    CMST 334 - Conflict and Communication

    (3)
    This course examines communication patterns and uses as they affect conflict in interpersonal relationships. Students will develop an understanding of various approaches to the study and assessment of communication and conflict. Students will learn and apply skills for conflict management such as collaboration, process and practice of mediation, and reconciling interests.

    Prerequisite(s): COMM 110.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    CMST 336 - Gender and Communication

    (3)
    This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the effects of gender on the communication process and to develop and improve their skills in the area of gender and communication. The course will deal with biological, social, and cultural influences on gender communication, the effect of gender in relationships, and the impact of gender in friendship, marital and family contexts, the workplace, church, and educational settings.

    Prerequisite(s): COMM 110.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    SPCH 220 - Public Speaking

    (3)
    A basic course in research and the organizing and delivering of informative and persuasive speeches in various contexts, from the informal lectern to more formal, professional settings.

    Prerequisite(s): COMM 110.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    SPCH 240 - Forensics

    (1-3)
    Students may receive 1-3 hours of credit per semester (maximum of 6 hours) for participation in intercollegiate individual events competition.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    SPCH 242 - Debate

    (1-3)
    Debate is designed to help students develop skills such as listening and critical thinking, analysis, research, and public speaking. Students will learn how to support proposals (ideas) and raise objections to proposals. Intercollegiate competition and on-campus exhibition debates are required.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    SPCH 340 - Forensics

    (1-3)
    Students may receive 1-3 hours of credit per semester (maximum of 6 hours) for participation in intercollegiate individual events competition.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    SPCH 342 - Debate

    (1-3)
    Debate is designed to help students develop skills such as listening and critical thinking, analysis, research, and public speaking. Students will learn how to support proposals (ideas) and raise objections to proposals. Intercollegiate competition and on-campus exhibition debates are required.

    Offered each semester.

Computer Science

  
  •  

    CPSC 130 - Introduction to Computer Science

    (3)
    This course provides an introduction to computer science. The course is designed to be taken as either the first course in the Computer Science major or as a general interest course. Topics will include computer components, operating system concepts, files, and an introduction to computer programming using tools and languages designed for easy learning. Extensive lab work will be used to provide practical experience for classroom concepts.

    Co-requisite(s): MATH 130 or proficiency

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    CPSC 131 - Computer Programming and Computer Science Concepts I

    (3)
    This course provides an introduction to computer programming and key computer science concepts including variable typing, major control structures, input/output formatting, and functions. Information concerning career opportunities and future computer science course requirements is discussed. Programming is a primary emphasis in this course.

    Prerequisite(s): CPSC 130 or permission of instructor.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    CPSC 231 - Computer Programming and Computer Science Concepts II

    (3)
    A continuation of CPSC 131 including concepts of programming development environments, object-oriented programming, files, events and other topics.

    Prerequisite(s): CPSC 131 or permission of instructor.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    CPSC 290 - Data Structures

    (3)
    Development and application of static and dynamic data structures including lists, stacks, queues, and binary search trees. Each data structure’s purpose, properties, methods and associated algorithms, and applications are discussed.

    Prerequisite(s): CPSC 131 or permission of the instructor; MATH 210 is recommended. Co-requisite(s): CPSC 304 is recommended

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    CPSC 301 - Computer Architecture

    (3)
    Concepts associated with computer organization and architecture are discussed. Topics include computer history, digital logic, processor structure, instruction sets, the memory hierarchy, input/output, and parallelism. Students have hands-on experience with computer hardware.

    Prerequisite(s): CPSC 231, 290 or permission of the instructor; MATH 210 recommended.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    CPSC 304 - Operating Systems

    (3)
    Students will learn the fundamental functions and concepts of operating systems in the context of studying several current operating systems. The course will include both internal and external views of operating systems.

    Prerequisite(s): CPSC 231 or permission of the instructor; MATH 210 is recommended.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    CPSC 313 - Analysis and Design of Algorithms

    (3)
    Topics include the design and analysis of algorithms and the development of programs to implement various algorithm designs. Algorithms for searching, sorting, and maintaining advanced data structures are presented. Experiments are conducted to explore algorithm efficiency when processing large data sets.

    Prerequisite(s): CPSC 304 or permission of the instructor; MATH 210 is recommended.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    CPSC 322 - Software Engineering

    (3)
    This is a study of software engineering principles including development methodologies, system design, implementation, and testing. Both technical and management issues will be addressed.

    Prerequisite(s): CPSC 304 or permission of the instructor.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    CPSC 340 - Visual Programming

    (3)
    This course provides an introduction to a visual programming language and associated application development environment. This environment enables the creation of GUI user-interfaces. Topics include visual design and application development, event-driven programming, and Web/database integration.

    Prerequisite(s): CPSC 304 or permission of the instructor.

    Offered Spring 2016 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    CPSC 341 - Networking

    (3)
    An introduction to Networking concepts and practice. Theory is introduced beginning with the major network layers. At each layer, the theory is applied to current Internet technology. Actual experience in the advanced CS lab with networking is an integral part of the course.

    Prerequisite(s): CPSC 304 or successful completion of the General Education Quantitative Reasoning Component or permission of the instructor.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    CPSC 346 - Web Programming: Client Side

    (3)
    This course covers the programming of the client (end user) side of a web application. Students will learn several technologies and languages used to program the client side of web applications with extensive lab experience in the CPSC labs.

    Prerequisite(s): CPSC 304 or permission of the instructor.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    CPSC 347 - Web Programming: Server Side

    (3)
    This course covers the underlying architecture and programming of web servers. Students will learn the protocols used, how to configure a specific web server, and how to write server-based programs in one or more languages.

    Prerequisite(s): CPSC 304 or permission of the instructor.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    CPSC 401 - Programming Languages

    (3)
    This course covers concepts underlying the design of computer programming languages. Topics include language history, describing syntax, names, data types, scopes, bindings, control structures, subprograms, object-oriented programming, concurrency, exception handling, functional programming, and logic programming. Given the fundamental concepts, students compare and contrast various programming languages.

    Prerequisite(s): CPSC 304 or permission of the instructor; MATH 210 is recommended.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    CPSC 411 - Server Operating Systems: LINUX Systems

    (3)
    This course will cover the basic concepts of current LINUX and UNIX systems and will include extensive lab work using a version of LINUX. Students will learn operating system concepts, system administration, script creation, and other programming concepts.

    Prerequisite(s): CPSC 304 or permission of the instructor.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    CPSC 414 - Server Operating Systems: Enterprise Systems

    (3)
    In this course, students will study a specific operating system used in large scale enterprises. The course will include the architectural and design issues unique to large scale systems and provide practical lab work on using the operating system.

    Prerequisite(s): CPSC 304 or permission of the instructor.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    CPSC 430 - Database Design and Implementation

    (3)
    This course investigates the design, creation, modification, and production of a database. A major database system is used. The student will learn the features of a typical database system and the language associated with the system necessary to create and use a database. A significant project will be completed that incorporates many of the features of a typical database. Database design theory will be addressed.

    Prerequisite(s): CPSC 304 or permission of the instructor.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    CPSC 450 - Advanced Topics

    (1-3)
    Selected topics from any of the areas offered in computer science. Open to students with advanced standing in computer science.

    Enrollment by permission of the Department Chair.
  
  •  

    CPSC 460 - Senior Seminar

    (3)


    Students in this course will participate in the investigation of one or more topics that cannot be treated in the normal structure of the schedule of courses for the major, but which will be very beneficial for the student. Topics include such items as computer ethics, the current state of computer technology, the Internet, and information systems.

     

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of nine hours of computer science courses at the 300/400 level and junior/senior status.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.

  
  •  

    CPSC 490 - Internship

    (1-3)
    A variable-credit course for professional, off-campus internship experience. The credit may vary from 1-3 hours depending upon the number of hours worked in the professional environment and extent to which those hours represent computer science topics. Details for each specific case will be arranged with an instructor.

    Prerequisite(s): 12 hours of computer science courses.

    Offered each semester. Enrollment by permission of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum total of 3 credit hours.

Degree Completion for RNs

  
  •  

    NRN 202 - Nursing Perspectives

    (4)
    This course explores person, society, health, nursing education, environment, teaching, and learning as included in the Malone University School of Nursing and Health Sciences philosophy and as related to the Neuman Systems Model. The necessary development of characteristics that support nursing as a profession in research, education, and practice is discussed. Professional accountability is addressed through legal practice issues and ethical dimensions in nursing. The process of leadership, management, and dimensions of change as a basis for professional responsibility is introduced. Health promotion across the lifespan, cultural diversity, and use of nursing informatics are emphasized.

  
  •  

    NRN 301 - Health Assessment and Health Promotion

    (4)
    Participants utilize the nursing process, based on the Neuman Systems Model, as the methodology to promote health, manage care for health maintenance, and evaluate client outcomes. Emphasis is on health assessment in culturally diverse populations and the synthesis and generalization of nursing concepts for clients with needs. Clinical validation and application of nursing concepts and skills are provided in the nursing-clinical laboratory with the use of simulation.




  
  •  

    NRN 306 - Mathematics and Statistics in Health Care

    (3)
    This course provides a review and testing of mathematical skills and then focuses on descriptive and inferential statistics. A conceptual approach is used including terminology and the interpretation and utilization of statistics for research purposes. Opportunities are provided to analyze data and conduct selected statistical problems. A decision in made regarding statistics as the research proposal is completed.

  
  •  

    NRN 353 - Pathophysiology and Applied Therapeutics

    (3)
    This course is a comprehensive study of human pathophysiology with application in the areas of diagnostic studies, diet therapy, and pharmacotherapeutics. Simulated and actual case scenarios of persons across the lifespan who are experiencing single or multisystem disease processes are discussed. Diagnostic studies specific to disease processes are examined. Pharmacologic agents and nutrition therapy appropriate for maintenance and promotion of health are studied. Nursing care appropriate to the disease processes are discussed.

  
  •  

    NRN 391 - Communication and Group Theory

    (2)


    This course presents selected communication theories and facilitates the exploration of topics such as self-concepts, conflict, group process, and group culture. Application of theory is accomplished as students examine interpersonal relationships and communication principles as essential components for effective professional practice. Students analyze both a formal group and their own communication styles. The continued use of nursing informatics is emphasized.

     

 

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