2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    Sep 30, 2020  
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Accounting

  
  •  

    ACCT 211 - Principles of Accounting I

    (3)
    Fundamental processes of accounting applied to proprietorships and corporations. An introduction to analyzing, classifying and recording business transactions, adjusting and closing records, and preparing financial statements.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    ACCT 212 - Principles of Accounting II

    (3)
    This course continues the presentation of financial accounting fundamentals and presents the fundamentals of management accounting including principles of product costing; activity- based costing; and techniques for planning, controlling, and decision making.

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 211.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    ACCT 311 - Intermediate Accounting I

    (3)
    Extensive treatment of accounting statements, current and noncurrent accounts, accounting for ownership equity emphasizing the corporation, and analysis of financial statements.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in ACCT 212.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    ACCT 312 - Intermediate Accounting II

    (3)
    Continuation of ACCT 311 with special emphasis placed upon accounting for investment; capital investment; intangible assets; the current, contingent, and long-term liabilities of the business firm; and reporting income taxes and earnings per share.

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 311.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    ACCT 313 - Cost Accounting

    (3)
    Deals with materials, labor and overhead, cost allocation and distribution. Special emphasis on control and making of business decisions by using cost data.

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 212.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
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    ACCT 371 - Management of Information Systems

    (3)
    This course examines the nature of information technology and its dynamic functions in organizations. Through applications of basic software tools (e.g., database technology, decision support systems), case studies, and examinations of relevant theory (e.g., reengineering), the student is able to develop a cohesive view of the management of information systems in today’s organizations.

    Prerequisite(s): BUS 240 or MATH/PSYC 140; ability to use spreadsheet software (e.g., Microsoft Excel).

    Cross-listed with BUS 371.

    Offered each semester.
  
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    ACCT 411 - Advanced Accounting I

    (3)
    Accounting for mergers, consolidations and parent company and subsidiary relationships, preparation of consolidated statements. Also coverage of segmental and interim reporting.

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 312.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
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    ACCT 412 - Advanced Accounting II

    (3)
    Accounting for governmental and other not-for-profit organizations, estates and trusts, personal and business insolvency, and foreign currency transactions and translation.

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 312.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
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    ACCT 421 - Tax Accounting I

    (3)
    Accounting problems and issues concerning the federal and state tax obligations of individuals, the self-employed, and small business organizations; also estate, gift, employment, and other taxes.

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 212.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
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    ACCT 422 - Tax Accounting II

    (3)
    Accounting problems and issues concerning the federal, state, and local tax obligations of partnerships and corporations; also property and other related taxes.

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 421.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
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    ACCT 423 - Auditing Theory

    (3)
    A presentation of the auditor’s role in business and society, including professional status and resultant responsibilities; impact on the auditor of legal liability; and detailed study of auditing theory, processes, procedures, and reporting.

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 311.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
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    ACCT 450 - Advanced Topics

    (1-3)
    An opportunity for the superior student to pursue, under supervision, an area of special interest either on his/her own initiative or in a seminar group. Open to juniors or seniors who are majors in the area and who have completed or are taking regularly scheduled courses.

    Enrollment by permission of the Department Chair.

American Sign Language

  
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    ASL 111 - American Sign Language I

    (4)
    Instruction in the basics of American Sign Language (ASL) grammar/ structure and vocabulary, expressive and receptive skills, and development of real-life conversational skills.

    Prerequisite(s): None.

    Offered each Fall.
  
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    ASL 112 - American Sign Language II

    (4)
    Continuation (from ASL 111) of instruction in the basics of American Sign Language (ASL) grammar/ structure and vocabulary, expressive and receptive skills, and development of real-life conversational skills.

    Prerequisite(s): ASL 111.

    Offered each Spring.

Applied Music

Private lessons in piano, voice, organ, guitar, orchestral instruments, conducting, or composition may be elected by any student who qualifies. A minimum of six hours of practice per week is required for each 30-minute lesson. See the Music Handbook available in the department office for further details regarding applied music and related fees.

  
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    MUS 100 - Applied Music

    (1-2 each semester)
    A minimum of two semesters of applied lessons at each level and concurrent attendance in Studio Class at all levels is required for all music, music education, and music ministry majors.

  
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    MUS 100P - Applied Music-Preparatory Level

    (1 each semester)
    Instruction in the rudiments of the chosen area. Does not count as music major credit. Elective credit for non-music majors. One each semester or until able to pass the qualifying examination.

  
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    MUS 200 - Applied Music

    (1-2 each semester)
    A minimum of two semesters of applied lessons at each level and concurrent attendance in Studio Class at all levels is required for all music, music education, and music ministry majors.

  
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    MUS 300 - Applied Music

    (1-2 each semester)
    A minimum of two semesters of applied lessons at each level and concurrent attendance in Studio Class at all levels is required for all music, music education, and music ministry majors.

  
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    MUS 400 - Applied Music

    (1-2 each semester)
    A minimum of two semesters of applied lessons at each level and concurrent attendance in Studio Class at all levels is required for all music, music education, and music ministry majors.


Art

  
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    ART 101 - Studio Experiences in Art

    (1)
    This class is designed to give non-art majors experience in visual communication. It will address hands-on expression and aesthetic opportunities for students to use God-given talents in the visual arts. This introductory class includes experiences in drawing, painting, and one other area of concentration (photography, fibers, or ceramics) with historical readings to supplement the production work. Materials fee.

    Offered each Fall.
  
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    ART 122 - Art History I: Ancient, Medieval, and Non-European Art

    (3)
    A historical survey of art from ancient through Gothic, including some non-Western art: India, China, Japan, Native arts of the Americas, Africa, and the South Pacific.

    Offered each Fall.
  
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    ART 124 - Art History II: Renaissance to the Present

    (3)


    A historical survey of art from the Renaissance through the twentieth century, including some non-Western art: India, China, Japan, Native arts of the Americas, Africa, and the South Pacific.

     

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.

  
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    ART 232 - Studio Experiences in 2D Design

    (3)
    Studio projects introducing a variety of two-dimensional media: painting and drawing with a focus on collage. Emphasis is placed on using the elements and principles of design as a basis for creating artworks. Materials fee.

    Offered each Fall.
  
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    ART 251 - Painting I

    (3)
    Introduction to the use of oil and/or water base media with an emphasis on pictorial structure. Three-hour lab includes lecture. Materials fee plus basic art supplies supplied by student.

    Offered each Spring.
  
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    ART 271 - Graphics I: Visual Design

    (3)


    Visual Design is an exploration of the elements and principles involved in perception as it pertains to graphic design. Students will be introduced to the profession of graphic design, what functions designers perform for their clients, as well as the impact of graphic design on society from the past to the present. Students will create “real world solutions” to design challenges using current graphic design software and computer technology. Studio work will be reinforced with lecture and demonstration to understand the principal concepts of graphic design. Application of traditional artistic design principles and aesthetics to computer graphics. Includes hands-on use of Macintosh computers operating current graphics software, scanners, digital cameras, color laser printers, etc.

     

    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore status.

    Offered each Fall.

  
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    ART 303 - Studio Experiences in 3D Design

    (3)
    An introduction to a variety of three-dimensional media in order to explore volume, mass, and structure. Aspects of functional vs. nonfunctional design in three-dimensional works will be emphasized. Materials fee.

    Offered each Spring.
  
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    ART 304 - Applied Arts: Introduction to Drawing

    (3)
    The subject matter of still life, landscape, and figures will be used to explore the design elements of line, mass, value, texture, and space. Dry media including conte crayon, charcoal, and graphite as well as wet media of ink and washes will be used. Compositional choices and visual awareness are stressed and explored through research and drawing. Materials fee.

    Offered each Spring. Enrollment priority given to art and visual arts education majors.
  
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    ART 307 - The History of Women Artists

    (3)
    A historical survey of women artists from the ancient through the contemporary, including a study of societal impact of women working in the visual arts and a study of how women have been pictured throughout western history.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
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    ART 311 - Art for Early and Middle Childhood Education

    (3)
    A course designed to assist the pre-service teacher in formulating a philosophy of art education and training him/her in the fundamental procedures, methods, and materials of teaching art in the early and middle school setting. Includes 15 hours of field experience in public school art classes, formulation of age-appropriate lesson plans, and peer teaching opportunities. Participation in OAEA and student membership required. Materials fee.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 232, 270.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
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    ART 312 - Drawing II

    (3)
    Further development of drawing skills through observation of natural objects to aid expressive draftsmanship and pictorial accuracy with the opportunity to experiment with various media and techniques. Materials fee.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 304.

    Offered each Spring.
  
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    ART 314 - Applied Arts: Traditional Darkroom Photography

    (3)


    A general history of how an image is ‘captured’ from the visual arts to silhouettes, pinhole cameras, 35mm film, and digital imaging. Camera settings, composition, and developing film along with the various printing processes used in the ‘wet lab’ will show the creative solutions to each assignment. Research topics will include historical techniques and photographers plus contemporary techniques and photographers. Text required. 35mm camera required (or may be borrowed from the department).

     

      Materials fee.

    Offered each semester.

  
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    ART 321 - Graphics II: Typography

    (3)


    Typography is an introduction to the study of typographic letterforms and practices. Through studio exercises that employ design methods and computer work, the students will develop an understanding and appreciation for the creative possibilities that type offers for visual communications. Students will explore terminology, type design, typographical hierarchy, and syntax through studio exercises, projects, lectures, demonstrations, and critiques to understand the relationship between words and images as a tool for visual communication. Includes hands-on use of Macintosh computers operating current graphic design software.

     

    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore status; ART 271.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.

  
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    ART 323 - Graphics III: Computer-Assisted Design

    (3)
    Advanced computer image manipulation of vector and raster images. Includes problem-solving techniques specifically for photo editing (retouching and manipulation), 3-dimensional illustration, production-ready file set-up, and interactive design. Students will engage in creative, intelligent, purposeful, and appropriate visual decisions in design. Students will use Macintosh computers, focusing on the use of Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, and Adobe Acrobat.




    Prerequisite(s): ART 271. ART 321 suggested.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
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    ART 342 - Life Drawing

    (3)
    Principles and practices of creative and structural figure drawing; development of concepts and techniques for competent graphic expression related to drawing life forms. Materials fee.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 304 or permission of department chair.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    ART 351 - Oil/Acrylic Painting II

    (3)
    Further exploration of painting and technique from traditional to contemporary using oil and acrylic paint as a medium emphasizing individual artistic response. Materials fee.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 251.

    Offered each Fall.
  
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    ART 363 - Advanced Photography

    (3)
    Students will continue their study of selected photographers, developing and printing 35 mm black and white film, and manipulating images in the digital darkroom. Written and oral critiques will accompany each assignment.


    Text required. Materials fee. Student provides 35mm/digital cameras.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 261 or permission.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    ART 371 - Sculpture: Clay

    (3)
    An introduction to sculpting and casting the figure and portrait in clay and plaster. Materials fee.

    Offered on demand.
  
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    ART 375 - Applied Arts: Hand-building and Wheel Thrown Ceramics

    (3)
    Hand-building and throwing on the potter’s wheel will introduce the basic foundational skills in ceramics along with terminology, use of tools, glazing, and firing. Historical and contemporary potters will be researched and discussed for design and construction techniques. Materials fee.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    ART 376 - Ceramics II

    (3)
    The intermediate ceramics course will strengthen the students’ skills based on hand-building methods and on the potter’s wheel. Concentration will be on quality of construction, increased knowledge of terminology, firing, and the history of ceramics. Individual potters will be studied for design possibilities.


    Fee required.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 375.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
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    ART 381 - Applied Arts: Tie Dye and Batik

    (3)


    Experiences with a variety of fiber and dye processes aimed at helping the student to express ideas creatively. Tie and dye, batik, surface design, quilting, and stitchery will be covered. Other fiber media covered at the discretion of the instructor to include an introduction to weaving, felting, and papermaking. Research into traditional quilt techniques and the work of contemporary quilt artists is required.

     

      Materials fee.

    Offered each Fall.

  
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    ART 382 - Applied Arts: Surface Design Techniques

    (3)
    Exploration into the surface design techniques of silk screening, monoprinting, painting, and various transfer processes. Research into historical background and current applications by contemporary artists is also required. Materials fee.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    ART 385 - Printmaking

    (3)


    Traditional and contemporary techniques in printmaking including monotype, relief, and intaglio processes using water and oil-based inks. Historical aspects, safety, and environmental concerns are discussed.

      Materials fee.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 232, 304.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.

  
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    ART 421 - Teaching Art in the Secondary School

    (3)
    This course is designed to provide the pre-service teacher majoring in visual arts education with specific practical classroom experience, developing various forms of assessments, and reviewing national and state Visual Arts standards before student teaching. Includes 15 hours of field experience in public school art classes, formulation of age-appropriate lesson plans, and peer teaching opportunities. Participation in OAEA and student membership required. Materials fee.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 311. Co-requisite(s): EDUC 405

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
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    ART 430 - Senior Exhibit/Portfolio

    (2)
    Senior class exhibition of student work coinciding with portfolio review and oral examination that follows a six-week, in-class instruction in résumé writing, artist statement, image preparation, and related professional issues. For Art Education majors, this class cannot be taken during the student teaching semester. It must be taken during the student’s final semester, either prior to or following student teaching.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing with concentration hours completed.

    Offered each Spring.
  
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    ART 442 - Advanced Drawing

    (3)
    For the advanced student to pursue conceptual imagery in drawings as completed visual statements emphasizing personal interpretation. Materials fee.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 304.

    Offered each Spring.
  
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    ART 450 - Advanced Topics

    (1-3)
    Group or individual studies in advanced techniques in painting, drawing, photography, fibers, ceramics, or graphics; individual internship in the arts area. Open only to juniors and seniors who have completed required courses in their areas of emphasis. Materials fee.

    Enrollment by permission of department chair.
  
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    ART 451 - Oil/Acrylic Painting III

    (3)
    An opportunity for the student to experience various media and techniques, to pursue personal style and to concentrate on elements of personal significance. Materials fee.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 251.

    Offered each Spring.
  
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    ART 452 - Advanced Painting

    (3)
    For the advanced student to pursue personal style and to concentrate on specific elements as determined by the student’s individual interest. Emphasis placed on individuality and arranged critiques. Materials fee.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 251.

    Offered each Fall.
  
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    ART 460 - Issues in Contemporary Art

    (3)
    A course designed to explore a number of specific contemporary issues such as art education, visual culture, women in art, and Christian art. The format will include lectures, discussion, and research which will be taught from historical and contemporary perspectives.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 124.

    Offered each Fall.
  
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    ART 461 - Fine Art Photography I

    (3)


    An introduction to the aesthetic, conceptual, and technical traditions of photography as a fine art form: traditional, non-traditional, and commercial formats. Refined wet-lab techniques and computer programs will produce quality images for matting. Lighting set-ups will be introduced. Studying selected photographers and vesting oneself in the assignment along with written and oral critiques will complete this process.

      Text required. Materials fee. Student provides 35mm/digital cameras.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 261.

    Offered each Fall.

  
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    ART 462 - Fine Art Photography II

    (3)
    A continuation of Art 461. Lighting, wet-lab techniques, computer programs, and manipulating surface techniques will enhance the quality of each image. Assignments will focus on landscapes, portraits, and commercial products. Studying selected photographers will assist in this process.


    Text required. Materials fee. Student provides 35mm/digital cameras.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 261.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    ART 476 - Ceramics III

    (3)


    Advanced ceramics emphasizes aesthetic and professional development through personal artistic interpretation. Each piece will demonstrate a high proficiency in hand-building, throwing, glazing, and firing clay bodies. Through research in design and techniques, students will create traditional and non-traditional ceramics.

      Materials fee.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 375 or 376.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.

  
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    ART 483 - Fiber Arts III

    (3)
    For advanced fiber art students to further explore the surface design techniques of their choice with attention to working in a series. Emphasis on exhibiting, image preparation on CD, establishing a professional portfolio, and résumé. Materials fee.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 381, 382.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    ART 490 - Internship

    (1-3)
    Practical hands-on experience in art: museum and/or gallery, graphics, photography, studio assistantships. May be repeated once.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing.

    Enrollment is limited to students who have signed a contract (see department chair for contract). Signatures of the internship supervisor and the department chair are required.

Bible

  
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    BIBL 111 - The Old Testament

    (3)
    A survey of the Old Testament in its Ancient Near Eastern contexts and as interpreted by modern scholarship, the synagogue, and the church. The transmission of the writings and major literary, theological, and ethical themes are explored in support of a holistic approach to the study of Scripture.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    BIBL 121 - The New Testament

    (3)
    A survey of the New Testament in its Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts and as interpreted by modern scholarship. The major literary, theological, and ethical themes are explored with an eye to the development of skills for lifelong biblical study and interpretation.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    BIBL 200 - Biblical Literature

    (3)
    An introduction to the Bible in light of its historical and cultural contexts. Emphasis is placed upon helping students develop skills which will facilitate a lifelong study and appreciation of the Bible. Attention is given to the following areas of study: content, message, significant people and events, literary features, and contemporary application. Only students in the nursing degree completion program may register for this course.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of the first two semesters.

  
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    BIBL 307 - The Synoptic Gospels

    (3)
    An understanding of the Synoptic Gospels within their historical contexts and in light of several methods of interpretation. The basic teachings of Jesus are examined within the broad outlines of his life and ministry.

    Prerequisite(s): BIBL 111, 121.

    Offered Fall 2014 and Fall 2017.
  
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    BIBL 309 - Hermeneutics

    (3)
    A study of the history of the interpretation of the Bible, basic principles of biblical interpretation, and reference works for the biblical student will be explored. Emphasis is placed on the practical use of hermeneutics for ministry.

    Offered each semester.
  
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    BIBL 313 - Romans

    (3)
    An in-depth study of the book of Romans with a view to understanding the basic theology of Paul. Particular attention will be given to both exposition and the major themes of the letter.

    Prerequisite(s): BIBL 111, 121.

    Offered Spring 2016 and Spring 2019.
  
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    BIBL 314 - The Gospel and Epistles of John

    (3)
    The Gospel and Epistles of John will be studied in detail. The context presumed is the struggle of the Johannine churches in Ephesus in Asia Minor with their self-definition against Judaism and emerging gnosticism. Current understandings of the Johannine School and Community provide the interpretive framework.

    Prerequisite(s): BIBL 111, 121.

    Offered Fall 2015 and Fall 2018.
  
  •  

    BIBL 315 - The Prison Epistles of Paul

    (3)
    The Prison Epistles of Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, Philemon, and II Timothy are studied together as the products of Paul’s two Roman imprisonments. Related issues especially pertinent to these epistles will also receive emphasis including the nature of first century imprisonment, gnosticism, and Christology.

    Prerequisite(s): BIBL 111, 121.

    Offered Spring 2015 and Spring 2018.
  
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    BIBL 317 - The Corinthian Correspondence

    (3)
    The Epistles of Paul to the Corinthians are studied in their Greco- Roman milieu. Emphasis is placed on interpretation that acknowledges their historical, social, and cultural contexts while contextualizing that interpretation for current application.

    Prerequisite(s): BIBL 111, 121.

    Offered Spring 2014 and Spring 2017.
  
  •  

    BIBL 321 - Pentateuch

    (3)
    An analysis of the contents and basic spiritual concepts of each book, and their place in the development of Israelite institutions and theology. Study of the historical, geographical, and archeological aspects is emphasized.

    Prerequisite(s): BIBL 111, 121.

    Offered Fall 2014 and Fall 2017.
  
  •  

    BIBL 323 - The Prophets of the Old Testament

    (3)
    A study of the prophets and their messages with attention given to messianic prophecy; the political, religious, and social conditions of the times; and the relevance of their messages today.

    Prerequisite(s): BIBL 111, 121.

    Offered Spring 2015 and Spring 2018.
  
  •  

    BIBL 325 - The Historical Books

    (3)
    The Historical Books of the Old Testament are explored with special attention to historical reconstruction and theological themes used by the biblical writers to tell the history and story of Israel.

    Prerequisite(s): BIBL 111, 121.

    Offered Fall 2015 and Fall 2018.
  
  •  

    BIBL 332 - Major Prophets: (Name)

    (3)
    This course shall be a study of one of the following: Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, or Daniel. The purpose is to give the student the opportunity for in-depth investigation into the life, context, and message of one of the more lengthy and substantive prophets of the Old Testament. Primary themes, depending on which prophet is studied, will include the meaning of justice, righteousness, repentance, messianic expectation, and the kingdom of God. The structure and literary movement of the book in question shall also be carefully analyzed.

    Prerequisite(s): BIBL 111, 121.

    Offered Fall 2013 and Fall 2016.
  
  •  

    BIBL 340 - Lands of the Bible Study Tour

    (1-3)
    A three- to five-week course of study in either Israel or Greece for students interested in the geography, history, and archeology of the Old and New Testaments.

    Offered on demand.
  
  •  

    BIBL 367 - Hebrews, James, I and II Peter, Jude

    (3)
    Hebrews and the Catholic Epistles of James, I and II Peter, and Jude are studied within the context of their associated early Christian communities. The focus is upon what they say for the development of early Christian doctrine and emerging struggles with libertinism, wealth, eschatological skepticism, and apostasy.

    Prerequisite(s): BIBL 111, 121.

    Offered Spring 2016 and Spring 2019.
  
  •  

    BIBL 423 - Poetical Books

    (3)
    Explored are the nature and characteristics of Hebrew poetry with attention to the background, theology, and teaching of Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Song of Solomon.

    Prerequisite(s): BIBL 111, 121.

    Offered Spring 2016 and Spring 2019.
  
  •  

    BIBL 427 - Theology of the Old Testament

    (3)
    This course introduces students to the milieu of Old Testament thought and theology by analyzing texts which capture the development and broad range of thinking about Israel’s God. Selections from each major genre of the Old Testament (Law, Prophets, History, Wisdom, Poetry) shall be investigated and compared. Also included is a survey of the history of scholarship in Old Testament studies with an emphasis on the contributions of key Old Testament scholars.

    Prerequisite(s): BIBL 111, 121.

    Offered Spring 2014 and Spring 2017.
  
  •  

    BIBL 432 - The Gospel of Luke

    (3)
    The Gospel of Luke is studied as one volume of the two-volume work of Luke-Acts written by Luke, co-worker of Paul the Apostle. The major themes of Luke are the focus, with special emphasis upon how these themes are developed through the construction of the gospel.

    Prerequisite(s): BIBL 111, 121.

    Offered Fall 2013 and Fall 2016.
  
  •  

    BIBL 435 - The Acts of the Apostles

    (3)
    The Book of Acts is studied for its use in reconstructing the history of the first century church and its theological contribution. To accomplish this, all aspects of the world with which Acts interacts will be studied, including religious, political, social, cultural, and ideological.

    Prerequisite(s): BIBL 111, 121.

    Offered Spring 2014 and Spring 2017.
  
  •  

    BIBL 442 - The Book of Revelation

    (3)
    The proposals for authorship, date, social situation, literary genres, and purpose of Revelation will be carefully assessed. The content of Revelation will be discussed in a verse-by-verse, chapter- y-chapter fashion, with special focus on disputed matters of interpretation.

    Prerequisite(s): BIBL 111, 121.

    Offered Fall 2014 and Fall 2017.
  
  •  

    BIBL 450 - Advanced Topics

    (1-3)
    An opportunity for superior students to pursue a subject of special interest on their own initiative or a seminar group. Open only to juniors or seniors who are majors in this area and who have completed or are taking regularly scheduled courses.

    Enrollment by permission of the Department Chair.
  
  •  

    BIBL 462 - The Social World of the New Testament

    (3)
    This course examines the primary documents of the Jewish, Greek, and Roman cultures of the first century CE and secondary analysis of them with an eye toward understanding the political, religious, social, cultural, and ideological arenas from which the books of the New Testament emerged. How these documents illumine specific texts throughout the New Testament and prevent anachronistic interpretation is the focus.

    Prerequisite(s): BIBL 111, 121.

    Offered Fall 2013 and Fall 2016.

Biology

  
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    BIOL 100 - Biological Principles

    (4)
    This course is designed to provide an appreciation for life and its complexities. It will explore the structure and function of cells and the mechanisms of gene expression, heredity, ecology and evolutionary biology. Current issues topics such as cloning, stem cell research, and conservation biology will be explored throughout the course. This course does not fulfill the science requirements for any Malone major or minor. Includes one 2-hour lab per week.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    BIOL 131 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I

    (4)
    This course is designed to acquaint the student with the structure and function of the human body. The topics covered are basic chemical principles related to biology, cell structure and function, homeostasis, the basic tissue types, the integumentary system, skeletal system (axial and appendicular, bone growth), muscular system (muscle tissue, sliding filament theory, muscle metabolism and muscle groups) and central nervous system (special senses, sensory-motor integration added). Includes one 2-hour lab per week.

    Prerequisite(s): High school biology and chemistry.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    BIOL 132 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II

    (4)
    This course is designed to acquaint the student with the structure and function of the human body. The topics covered are cardiovascular system (blood, heart, vessels, hemodynamics), immunity/lymphatics, respiratory system, digestive system, metabolism, urinary system, reproductive system. Includes one 2-hour lab per week.

    Prerequisite(s): High school biology and chemistry.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    BIOL 144 - General Biology I

    (4)
    An introduction of biological principles with an emphasis on sub-cellular structure, metabolism, reproduction, growth, inheritance, and adaptation. Includes one 2-hour lab per week.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    BIOL 145 - General Biology II

    (3)
    An introduction to biology at the organism, population, and community levels. Comparative approach to anatomy and physiology of organisms as well as trophic interaction within communities. Includes one 2-hour lab per week.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    BIOL 150 - Zoo Biology and Management

    (2)
    This is a foundational course so that the student will understand all aspects of zoo operations including, but not limited to, research, conservation management, development of captive breeding programs, diet formulation, administration, education, and the ethics of keeping animals in captivity. Contemporary zoos will be used as models to explore these issues. This course is open to Zoo and Wildlife Biology majors only.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 144, 145.

    Offered at Cleveland Metroparks Zoo each Summer (Session I).
  
  •  

    BIOL 173 - Introduction to Human Biology

    (4)
    Provides understanding of human structure and function of all body systems. Focus will be given to beginning chemistry principles, cells, and tissues. This course is for the student who has little or no background in human anatomy and physiology. The laboratory component will solidify the theoretical knowledge gained in lecture through hands-on experiments and dissection. Includes one 2-hour lab per week.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    BIOL 190 - Nutrition

    (3)
    A study of basic principles of normal nutrition with application to overall nutritional status of individuals. Conceptual focus is on the role of nutrients in maintenance of the structure and function of man for promotion of health.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    BIOL 200 - General Botany

    (4)
    Study in the structure and function of plants with emphasis on flowering plants. Laboratory studies will cover the macro and microstructure of plants as well as their growth and development. Includes one 2-hour lab per week.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 145.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    BIOL 253 - Invertebrate Zoology

    (3)
    This course is designed as an extrapolation into the basic structure, function, and ecology of invertebrates. It utilizes the knowledge gained from Organismal Biology to explore intricate mechanisms employed by invertebrates. In addition, potential evolutionary theories and mechanisms that may bring about diversity within populations are discussed. Weekly laboratories combined with a student invertebrate collection provide the student with firsthand experience of the invertebrates with which we live. Includes one 2-hour lab per week.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 145.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    BIOL 254 - Vertebrate Zoology

    (3)
    This course focuses on animals with backbones (vertebrates). Structure, function, and potential evolutionary connections are discussed throughout the semester. Laboratories focus primarily on anatomy and physiology. Includes one 2-hour lab per week.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 131 or 132 or 145.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    BIOL 313 - Principles of Immunology

    (4)
    Presents theories of how the immune system works, genetic basis for immune function, immunological response to disease, diseases of the immune system with emphasis on auto- immune disorders and AIDS, and immunological techniques applied to diagnosis and research. Includes one 2-hour lab per week.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 144; CHEM 132.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    BIOL 332 - Creation and Evolution

    (3)
    A course relating to the philosophy of biology, comparing the views of creation and evolution. An attempt to understand and properly appreciate both views as theories and to integrate them into a holistic world view.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 100 or 144 or 145; junior standing.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    BIOL 342 - Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy and Physiology

    (4)
    This course will thoroughly survey the anatomical and physiological differences between the various vertebrate classes by use of lectures and laboratory dissections, and will examine the evolutionary trends and phenomena and other models that give rise to the variation we see within this subphylum of chordates. Includes one 3-hour lab per week.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 254.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    BIOL 353 - Ornithology

    (4)
    A study of the classification of birds and the interrelationships to their life histories of their anatomy, physiology, and development. Emphasis on field acquaintance and identification of local species. Includes one 2-hour lab per week. Frequent field trips.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 254.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    BIOL 354 - Herpetology

    (4)
    This course will provide students with foundational knowledge of the biology of amphibians and reptiles. Students will gain the ability to critically review published research and independently design, conduct, and interpret their own research on amphibians and reptiles. Concepts taught in this course will have broad applicability to other areas of natural science including systematics, developmental biology, neurobiology, ecology, and endocrinology. Other topics include phylogenetic relationships, species diversity, morphology and physiology, ecological relationships, and conservation aspects. Includes one 3-hour lab per week.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 254.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    BIOL 362 - Virology

    (3)
    This course covers the study of the structure and life cycles of prokaryotic, plant, animal, and human viruses focusing on the viral protein structures and the host cell’s molecular mechanisms. Emphasis will be placed on virus families related to human pathology including oncogenic viruses. Host immunological responses, development of vaccines and anti-viral medications as well as the socioeconomic and historic impact of sporadic, seasonal, epidemic, and pandemic viral infections will also be covered.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 144; CHEM 132; or permission of the instructor.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    BIOL 371 - Microbiology

    (4)
    Emphasizing the morphology and physiology of micro-organisms with application both in beneficial processes and in disease. Includes two 2-hour labs per week.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 144 or CHEM 115 or 131.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    BIOL 372 - Genetics

    (4)
    A study of general principles of genetics as applied to both plants and animals. Includes one 2-hour lab per week.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 144; CHEM 131.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    BIOL 375 - Molecular Biology

    (4)
    Topics of study include but are not limited to nucleic acid structure, information transfer, protein synthesis, and signal transduction. Includes one 2-hour lab per week.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 144 and CHEM 132; or CHEM 374.

    Cross-listed with CHEM 375.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    BIOL 381 - General Ecology

    (4)
    A study of the relationships between plants and animals and their environment. Involves field survey, field trips, and some statistical treatment of data. Includes one 2-hour lab per week.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 145; MATH 130.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    BIOL 391 - Animal Population Management

    (3)
    This course will thoroughly investigate the mechanisms and technologies required to manage primarily vertebrate animals in captive conditions. The course emphasis will be to integrate natural ecosystem functions towards the design and maintenance of animal exhibits for the ultimate purpose of conservation management and education. This course is open only to Zoo and Wildlife Biology majors.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 150, 254, 381.

    Offered Summer. Includes frequent off-campus experiences.
  
  •  

    BIOL 410 - Animal Behavior

    (4)
    This course will introduce the student to the field of animal behavior. Basic principles derived from natural selection and other evolutionary mechanisms, ecology, ethology, and development will be examined and used to explain how (proximate questions) and why (ultimate questions) animals behave as they do in particular situations. Many important biological activities such as foraging, communication, migration, predator-prey interactions, mating, and parental care will be considered. Includes one 3-hour lab per week.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 253, 254.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    BIOL 413 - Neural Basis of Behavior

    (3)
    An overview of the neural mechanisms underlying natural behaviors of various organisms.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 144.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
 

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