2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    Nov 30, 2022  
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Exercise Science

  
  •  

    EXSC 212 - Human Fitness Assessment

    (2)
    Practical laboratory class teaching human fitness assessment in cardiovascular, muscular strength, endurance, flexibility, and body composition.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    EXSC 214 - Taping Skills Laboratory

    (2)
    The course includes the teaching of specialty tapings for the upper and lower extremities. Emphasis is placed on common athletic injury situations.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    EXSC 310 - Advanced Athletic Training

    (3)
    An advanced course designed to expand on the knowledge and evaluative skills of musculoskeletal injuries.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 131 or 273 or PE 215.

    Offered on demand.
  
  •  

    EXSC 313 - Kinesiology

    (3)
    An analysis of human motion based on anatomical, physiological, and mechanical principles. Basic motor and sport skills, as well as resistance training, are studied in a hands-on laboratory setting.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    EXSC 314 - Evaluation Skills Laboratory

    (2)
    The course provides the student athletic trainer with hands-on skills in evaluating athletic injuries. Attention is also given to proper record keeping in the training room.

    Co-requisite(s): PE 310

    Offered on demand.
  
  •  

    EXSC 334 - HHP Practicum

    (1)
    This course will allow students to bridge the gap between classroom learning and practical application in an exercise or health. Each major must complete this 30-hour practicum experience working in the Malone University Wellness Center. This practicum must be completed before a student can participate in an internship.

    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    EXSC 386 - Teaching Group Exercise

    (2)
    This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the educational concepts, performance techniques, program design, and leadership skills needed to teach group-led exercise programs and design personal training programs. The course will include basic analysis and application of safe and effective exercise procedures for all fitness levels.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    EXSC 413 - Physiology of Activity

    (3)
    A critical analysis of the physiological basis of muscular activity and the general effects of exercise on body function. Special emphasis is given to topics of significance to the physical educator and coach, including the energy systems, the effects of altitude on training, resistance training, gender-specific concerns, and the effect of stressful exercise on youths, beginning at age three.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    EXSC 433 - Rehabilitation and Modalities in Sports Medicine

    (3)
    This course is recommended for those Exercise Science students pursuing concentrations in Pre-Physical Therapy or Exercise Physiology. The course focuses on the rehabilitative programs for major joint injuries and the modalities used in conjunction to treat such injuries.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 131 or 273 or PE 215.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    EXSC 435 - Internship in Human Performance

    (1 or 3)
    Designed to give the student hands-on experience within the discipline of exercise science.

    Offered each semester. Enrollment by permission of the Exercise Science adviser.
  
  •  

    EXSC 461 - Fitness Programming and Prescription

    (3)
    This course is designed, through lecture and laboratory sessions, to provide the student with a specific basis and practical application for exercise prescription for resistance training, cardiovascular conditioning and flexibility programs, health risk appraisal, aspects of fitness leadership, and special populations. This course is designed to help prepare the student for the exercise prescription related knowledge, skills, and abilities required for the ACSM Health/Fitness Instructor Certification.

    Offered each Spring.

Greek

  
  •  

    GRK 211 - Introductory New Testament Greek I

    (3)
    The vocabulary, grammar, and syntax of koine Greek are studied with a predominantly deductive approach. Selected passages of the New Testament comprise the supporting exercises.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    GRK 212 - Intermediate New Testament Greek II

    (3)
    The continued study of the vocabulary, grammar, and syntax of koine Greek are studied with a predominantly deductive approach. The goal is facility in translation and beginning exegetical skills.

    Prerequisite(s): GRK 211.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    GRK 321 - Intermediate New Testament Greek I

    (3)
    Review of the vocabulary, grammar, and syntax of koine Greek. Translation of the Gospel of John. Promotion of mature exegetical skills.

    Prerequisite(s): GRK 212.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    GRK 322 - Intermediate New Testament Greek II

    (3)
    Translation of the Gospel of Mark and the Epistle to the Philippians and a major exegetical project.

    Prerequisite(s): GRK 321.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    GRK 450 - Advanced Topics

    (1-3)
    Topics selected from textual criticism, readings from individual texts, etc. Open only to juniors and seniors who have completed one or both of the 300-level courses.


Health Education

  
  •  

    HED 200 - Health Promotion and Education

    (3)
    An introductory course addressing the basic philosophies, theories, and practices in health education. This course will trace the development of health education, and will examine the roles of the health educator including clinical, occupational, community, and school settings. Health promotion, professional competencies of the health educator, role delineation, organizations, careers, ethics, and future trends will be discussed.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    HED 220 - Core Concepts of Health

    (3)
    Dimensions of health and factors that contribute to personal health, disease prevention, and well-being will be studied. An overview of health-related content will be presented including the major health content teaching areas such as cardiovascular health, cancer, family life and sexuality education, mental and emotional health. Ways to deliver health information as well as the role of individual responsibility, selfcare, and informed choice.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    HED 300 - Community and Public Health

    (3)
    An overview of institutional health agencies and organizations, both official and non-official, at local, state, national, and international levels. Exploration of both purpose and function of agencies and institutions for promoting and maintaining health of the community, meeting needs of community members, and addressing community health problems. Community health choices will be explored. Legislative influences at the federal and state level, community health, advertising, and watchdog agencies will be discussed.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    HED 322 - Global Health

    (3)
    This course provides an overview of global health concentrating on both agencies that deal with world health concerns and an in-depth analysis of the health issues which affect the world. The purpose and function of the global health agencies will be explored. Contemporary research initiatives dealing with world health topics will also be explored. In addition, discussion of global health concerns such emerging diseases, potable water, and deteriorating air quality will be emphasized.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    HED 330 - Organization of School Health: PreK-12

    (3)
    Major consideration is given to implementing a comprehensive school health program. The eight components include: 1) a healthful school environment; 2) school health instruction; 3) school health services; 4) school physical education; 5) school nutrition and food services; 6) school-based counseling; 7) school site health promotion; and 8) school, family and community health promotion partnerships. Planning, administration, and evaluation will be addressed. Emphasis will also be placed upon administration of health appraisals, emergency programs, a safe school environment, ethical and legal concerns, and community resources and support.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    HED 342 - Introduction to Illness and Diseases

    (3)
    This course focuses on health promotion and prevention of disease. Basic information regarding communicable and non-communicable diseases common to children, adolescents, and adults will be covered. Medical terminology, clinical signs and symptoms, universal precautions, and preventive behaviors will be introduced.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    HED 357 - Death and the Human Experience

    (3)
    Explores the relationship between death and health. Physiological, medical, psycho-logical, and legal aspects of dying will be examined as well as consumer aspects of death and dying in contemporary America. Course content will also focus on the meaning of death, respite care and the caregiver, rituals involved in the dying process, cultural influences, grief, bereavement, and death education and counseling for persons of all ages.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    HED 361 - Drug Education

    (3)
    Basic pharmacology and toxicology of common drugs, alcohol, and tobacco will be presented. Explores the physical, psychological, social, and legal consequences of drug use and abuse. Motivation for use and abuse of drugs is discussed as well as ways to address the problem.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    HED 372 - Environmental Health

    (3)
    Exploration of the interrelationship among humans and the environment and the basic principles of safety. Consideration of environmental health problems, ecological protection, and recognition of potentially hazardous situations will be given. Emphasis will be placed upon the promotion of environmental health and safety.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    HED 373 - Health and Aging

    (3)
    The dynamics of later life and the aging process with a specific emphasis on health will be addressed. Theories of aging, physiological, cognitive and behavioral dimensions of the aging process, and health promotion for the elderly will be discussed.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    HED 382 - Health Psychology and Behavior

    (3)
    This course will investigate the inter-relationship between psychology and health. Theoretical foundations, social networks, models and therapies, including cognitive and behavioral, and pharmacology will be explored. Behavioral research, interventions and coping mechanisms will be addressed as well as the impact the mind has on disease prevention and health promotion. In addition, a conceptual framework of health counseling will be introduced and applied to health related issues such as exercise, weight control, substance abuse, smoking cessation, sleep, and chronic pain. Self-responsibility and self-regulation will be examined.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    HED 425 - Health and Sexuality Education

    (3)
    A holistic and integrative approach in the exploration of personal issues related to sexuality and relationships including physical, psychological, and social aspects. Ethics and sexual responsibility will be addressed.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    HED 430 - Community and Public Health Promotion Internship

    (3)
    This course is intended for Community and Public Health Promotion majors. It is a pre-professional field experience including observation and participation in a community health agency. The placement will include program development and/or program evaluation.

    Prerequisite or Co-requisite: HED 431. Senior standing is also required.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    HED 431 - Program Planning and Evaluation

    (3)
    An overview of community program planning and promotion. Specific issues and course focus will include examination of program models and theories, needs assessments, program development and promotion. Methods to implement and evaluate programs will be emphasized. Junior standing required.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    HED 435 - Strategies and Practice in Health Promotion

    (3)
    This course will explore the delivery of health education through Identification, use and practice of the fundamental processes, techniques, strategies, and instructional methods as it relates to health promotion in multiple settings. Students will be examine existing resources and will participate in developing new resources to deliver health information to various audiences.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    HED 442 - Biostatistics and Epidemiology

    (3)
    The study of distribution and determinants of disease and injury. Students will examine acute and chronic health problems in populations through use of morbidity and mortality data, bio-statistics, and investigative techniques for the purpose of preventing health problems and developing programs to meet the health needs of various populations. Junior standing required.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    HED 450 - Advanced Topics

    (1-3)
    Topics chosen to meet the needs and interests of students enrolled. Open only to juniors and seniors who are majors in this area and who have completed or are taking regularly scheduled courses.

    Enrollment by permission of the Dean.

Hebrew

  
  •  

    HEBR 211 - Introductory Hebrew I

    (3)
    The rudiments of Hebrew lexicology, morphology, and syntax will be studied. Some tools of Old Testament exegesis will be introduced. The course will provide an integration of inductive and deductive approaches.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    HEBR 212 - Introductory Hebrew II

    (3)
    A review and continuation of basic Hebrew grammar and vocabulary. The student will begin reading from the Tanak and applying a variety of critical tools and resources to Old Testament interpretation.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    HEBR 321 - Intermediate Hebrew I

    (3)
    The student will work predominantly with the Tanak and shall demonstrate facility in translation, exegesis, and interpretation of Old Testament texts.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    HEBR 322 - Intermediate Hebrew II

    (3)
    Mature and capable scholarship in working with a variety of genres from the Tanak, as well as developing competency in text criticism, is the goal of this final course in Hebrew curriculum. This course solidifies the skills gained in the first three Hebrew courses.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    HEBR 450 - Advanced Topics

    (1-3)
    Topics selected from textual criticism, readings from individual texts, etc. Open only to juniors and seniors who have completed one or both of the 300-level courses.


History

Courses that qualify as upper-level western history courses are designated with (w) and upper-level non-western courses with (nw).

  
  •  

    HIST 105 - History Seminar

    (1)
    This seminar introduces history majors to how historians study the past and the role that history plays in society today. Students will be introduced to the methodology of history, such as the use of sources, research methods, the role of interpretation, and Christian approaches to the discipline. The seminar also explores issues of vocation for history majors, examining the role that Christian faith might play in one’s calling as a history major and options for what one might do with a history degree. Students are expected to take the course during their first spring semester at Malone.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    HIST 111 - World History I: The Ancient World to 1500

    (3)
    A study of the ancient Middle Eastern, Asian, Mediterranean, and European civilizations from the Paleolithic period to the Age of European Discovery. A liberal arts approach will be utilized that incorporates a comparative examination of the political, intellectual, social, and cultural contributions of each period and culture. Introduces students to historical analysis and critical thinking skills.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    HIST 112 - World History II: The Modern World

    (3)
    Examines major world civilizations from the Age of Discovery to the present. Special attention will be given to the Industrial Revolution, rise of nationalism and imperialism, the major world wars, communist revolutions, the Cold War, and the various ethno-religious tensions in the post-Cold War era. A liberal arts approach will be utilized that incorporates a comparative examination of the political, intellectual, social, and cultural contributions of each period and culture. Introduces students to historical analysis and critical thinking skills.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    HIST 211 - American History I: Colonial Era to the Civil War

    (3)
    Surveys the major cultural, political, economic, social, and religious themes in American history from the pre-Columbian era through the era of Reconstruction. Special attention will be given to the development of colonial societies, the formation of American political institutions, the structure of slavery, the growth of reform movements, the conflicts that provoked the Civil War, and the changes brought about by that war.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    HIST 212 - American History II: Gilded Age to the Present

    (3)
    This course surveys the major cultural, political, economic, social, and religious themes in American history from the Gilded Age to the present. Special attention will be given to industrialization, political reform, twentieth-century wars, women’s rights, civil rights, the Cold War, and cultural conflicts.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    HIST 321 - The Civil War and Reconstruction (w)

    (3)
    This course examines the causes, course, and impact of the Civil War and Reconstruction. It studies the sectional divisions, the motivations of ordinary people who fought in the war, military strategies, political activities, and the ways that African Americans affected the causes, course, and purposes of the war. It examines how Reconstruction shaped sectional differences, economic structures, race relations, political issues, and cultural ideals. Finally, the course looks at how the history of the Civil War itself has been written, including the differences between popular and academic histories, the meanings that various people attach to the war, and how the Civil War functions today in the memories of many Americans.

    Prerequisite(s): HIST 111 or 112.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    HIST 323 - The Quakers (w)

    (3)
    A study of the origins of Friends, the early evangelistic and missionary movements, quietism, schisms, revivals, and modernization. Attention will be given to the place of Evangelical Friends Church-Eastern Region in the history of Friends.

    Prerequisite(s): HIST 111 or 112.

    Cross-listed with THEO 323

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    HIST 324 - Medieval Europe (w)

    (3)
    A study of the emergence of Europe, the Byzantine Empire, the Islamic Caliphate after the Fall of the Roman Empire in the West. Political, social, economic, and cultural developments are examined. Special attention is given to Christianity in the Middle Ages, including religious thought, practices, and the development of monasticism and the papacy.

    Prerequisite(s): HIST 111 or 112.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    HIST 335 - Religion in America (w)

    (3)
    This course examines the emergence and development of diverse religious traditions in American history, including Puritans, Quakers, evangelicals, African American Christians, Catholics, Jews, Pentecostals, mainline Protestants and others. By studying the beliefs, spirituality, and practices of ordinary people, it examines how religion has embedded itself in popular American culture. Particular attention will be given to the role of civil religion in the United States, the historical shift from Protestant domination to a more secular culture, the stance taken by religious groups toward diversity in American society, and the relationship between “outsider” religious groups and the American institutional establishment.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    HIST 341 - African History (nw)

    (3)
    This course surveys the history of sub-Saharan Africa from the ancient kingdoms to the present day. This course includes the development of African kingdoms, traditional African institutions, the Atlantic slave trade, colonialism, missionaries and African Christians, nationalism, apartheid in South Africa, and recent African states.

    Prerequisite(s): HIST 111 or 112.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    HIST 351 - History of Modern China (nw)

    (3)
    A focus upon traditional China ending with the fall of the Manchu Dynasty in 1912, the struggle between the Nationalists and Communists for political control, the consolidation of Marxist power and recent crosscurrents of reform and repression.

    Prerequisite(s): HIST 111 or 112.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    HIST 356 - History and Politics of the Modern Middle East (nw)

    (3)
    An overview of the modern Middle East, focusing on the historical roots of conflict, the formation of modern states, the Arab-Israeli conflict, economic development issues, political Islam, and the role of women.

    Prerequisite(s): HIST 111 or 112 or permission of the instructor.

    Cross-listed with POL 356.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    HIST 357 - Islam and the West (w or nw)

    (3)
    A history of Western-Islamic interaction from the Crusades to the present. This course focuses on the historical development of Western views of and responses to Islam. Emphasis will be placed on the history of Christian-Muslim intellectual and cultural exchanges, Christian apologetics and missions, and the role of Islam in the development of Western ideas concerning just war and tolerance.

    Prerequisite(s): HIST 111 or 112.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    HIST 358 - History and Politics of East Asia: China and Japan (nw)

    (3)
    In the last quarter of the 20th Century, the nations of East Asia – China, Japan, North and South Korea, and Taiwan – emerged as major political and economic players on the global stage. The course surveys the history and cultural traditions of East Asia, with particular emphasis on China and Japan. It will focus on imperial China and the shogunates of Japan, the rise of nationalism in post- Qing China and post- Tokugawa Japan, revolution and modernization, recurring tensions between China and its East Asian neighbors, the rise of “tiger economies,” and an introduction to East Asian culture from feng shui to manga.

    Prerequisite(s): HIST 111 or 112.

    Cross-listed with POL 358.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    HIST 360 - Classical Greece and Rome (w)

    (3)
    A study of Greece and Rome from the Bronze Age through the Fall of the Roman Empire in the West. Political, intellectual, and cultural developments will be studied. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of the Greek city-state; the cultural and political achievements of Classical Greece and Rome; Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic world; and the rise and decline of Roman powers.

    Prerequisite(s): HIST 111 or 112.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    HIST 362 - Ohio History and Government (w)

    (3)
    The study of Ohio’s history and government will provide the students with an up-close look at the society with which they live and work. There will be an examination of all levels of government from the state down to the local unit.

    Prerequisite(s): HIST 111 or 112.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    HIST 366 - History of World Missions (w or nw)

    (3)
    This course surveys the history of the Christian missionary movement from the time of the early church to the present. Historical topics include missionary movements in “barbarian” Europe, colonial Latin America, and global efforts in the 19th and 20th centuries. Special attention will be given to issues of culture and authority that have emerged in the transmission of faith, as well as the implications of the recent shift of the center of Christianity from the northern to the southern half of the globe.

    Cross-listed with THEO 366.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    HIST 381 - History of Latin America (nw)

    (3)
    A survey of the cultural, political, economic, social, and religious forces that have shaped Latin America from its pre-Columbian era to the present. Special attention is given to pre-Columbian cultures, cross-cultural encounters, the relationship between religion and society, inequities of wealth, U.S./Latin American relations, and Hispanic immigration to the U.S.

    Prerequisite(s): HIST 111 or 112.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    HIST 435 - Early Modern Europe: Renaissance and Reformation (w)

    (3)
    A study of political, cultural, and religious aspects of the period from the late Middle Ages to the seventeenth century (1300-1700), with particular emphasis on the Italian Renaissance and the Protestant Reformation. Topics include late medieval reform movements, the Renaissance in northern and southern Europe, the development of various branches of Protestantism, the Catholic Reformation, and the Age of Religious Wars.

    Prerequisite(s): HIST 111 or 112.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    HIST 436 - Modern Europe: The Enlightenment to the Present (w)

    (3)
    A history of Europe from the eighteenth century to the present. Political, social, and intellectual developments are examined. Particular attention is paid to the Enlightenment; the French Revolution and Napoleonic Age; the rise of industrialization, liberalism, nationalism, nation-building, and imperialism in the eighteenth century; and the major events of the twentieth century, including the two world wars, totalitarianism, the Holocaust, the Cold War, and the fall of communism in Europe.

    Prerequisite(s): HIST 111 or 112.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    HIST 442 - Philosophy and Writing of History

    (3)
    A study of the nature and development of history as a discipline, of various philosophies of history, and of historiographical principles and methods. Includes a research component in which students are required to collect, analyze, and interpret historical data. Required of all history majors and minors and recommended to integrated social studies majors with a concentration in history.

    Prerequisite(s): HIST 111 or 112, and 211 or 212, and junior or senior standing.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    HIST 445 - Women in American History (w)

    (3)
    This course studies the significance of women in diverse areas of American society, from the colonial era to the present. While some attention will be given to notable individuals, emphasis will be placed on the role that women have played in all aspects of American life, including social structures, religion, politics, the economy, and cultural developments.

    Prerequisite(s): HIST 111 or 112.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    HIST 450 - Advanced Topics

    (1-3)
    An opportunity for the superior student to pursue, under supervision, an area of special interest either on his/her own initiative or in a seminar group. Open to juniors or seniors who are majors in this area and who have completed or are taking regularly scheduled courses.

    Enrollment by permission of the Department Chair.
  
  •  

    HIST 455 - U.S. Since 1945 (w)

    (3)
    This study examines the political, economic, and cultural developments of the United States since World War II. Topics include the development of the Cold War, American culture in the 1950s, the Civil Rights movement, the Korean and Vietnam wars, cultural changes of the 1960s, Watergate, and the Reagan era.

    Prerequisite(s): HIST 111 or 112.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    HIST 461 - History of World Religions (nw)

    (3)
    A study of the history of the main religions of the world, with particular emphasis on Indigenous Religions, Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, Shinto, Judaism, Islam, and Ba’hai. This course will focus on the most important beliefs and practices of each religious tradition. Students will learn about the founders and key individuals as well as examine portions of the sacred text(s) of several major religious traditions. Experiencing sacred music and places of worship of the world’s major religions will enable the development of a deepened understanding of other religions. Also emphasized will be cross-cultural engagement and a Christian response to interaction with adherents of other religions.

    Cross-listed with THEO 461.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    HIST 480 - Internship

    (1-3)
    The application of academic skills in an off-campus setting. Arrangements must be made with the course instructor.


Interdepartmental Courses

  
  •  

    FS 101 - Conservation of Natural Resources

    (2)
    A study of conservation practices in Ohio. This class involves field trips which cover topics such a green building, land usage, recycling and waste management, wastewater treatment, composting and wildlife conversation. Graded as credit/no credit.

    Offered twice each year.
  
  •  

    FS 103 - Survey of Natural Areas

    (2)
    A study of the relationships between plants and their environments in Ohio. The class involves field trips with an emphasis on the geology and flora of Ohio; a dichotomous key is used to identify tree and wildflower species. Graded as credit/no credit.

    Offered twice each year.
  
  •  

    FS 105 - Art Analysis Workshop

    (2)
    This course takes place during four Saturday sessions and is designed to be an introduction to art through its social and historical functions. During the first session, art will be viewed in all its forms as it has moved from a ritualistic function of the Paleolithic communities to an instructional device of Egyptian, Greek, and Roman cultures. An understanding will be developed of the Renaissance periods of Romanticism and subsequent Impressionism to a broad array of diverse approaches of the 21st century. Two museum visits incorporate gallery tours viewing permanent collections, current exhibitions, and presentations by museum personnel and the workshop facilitator. The final session includes discussion of today’s contemporary art world and class presentations during which students can share the new knowledge that has enriched their lives.
     

    Offered at least once per year (usually in the summer). Graded as credit/no credit.
  
  •  

    FS 250 - Field Study

    (1-3)
    Off-campus study (domestic or international) may be provided through workshops, study tours, online cooperative education, etc. Freshmen and sophomores take 250. Juniors and seniors take 350. Repeatable based upon unique content.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    FS 250 - Stratford/Shaw Festivals

    (3)
    For a long weekend during the fall semester, students can join a tour to the Stratford and Shaw Festivals in Ontario, Canada. Six to seven plays from a variety of genres (e.g., tragedies, comedies, musicals, mysteries) and by a variety of playwrights are seen. Most of the class takes place during the trip with some assignments to be done before and after. Students learn how a written text (the play) is transformed and interpreted on stage and how to understand a live performance and critique its success. For more information, contact either the Office of the Department of Communication Arts or the Office of the Department of Language and Literature.

  
  •  

    FS 350 - Field Study

    (1-3)
    Off-campus study (domestic or international) may be provided through workshops, study tours, online cooperative education, etc. Freshmen and sophomores take 250. Juniors and seniors take 350. Repeatable based upon unique content.

  
  •  

    FS 350 - Stratford/Shaw Festivals

    (3)
    For a long weekend during the fall semester, students can join a tour to the Stratford and Shaw Festivals in Ontario, Canada. Six to seven plays from a variety of genres (e.g., tragedies, comedies, musicals, mysteries) and by a variety of playwrights are seen. Most of the class takes place during the trip with some assignments to be done before and after. Students learn how a written text (the play) is transformed and interpreted on stage and how to understand a live performance and critique its success. For more information, contact either the Office of the Department of Communication Arts or the Office of the Department of Language and Literature.

  
  •  

    GEN 100 - The College Experience

    (1)
    Serves as an interactive experience in helping students make the transition to college and to the world of learning in general. There will be a variety of in- and out-of-class activities and plenary sessions which will acquaint students with the various facets of a liberal arts education including extra-curricular life on and off campus.

    Offered each Fall. Required of all traditional Freshmen.
  
  •  

    GEN 101 - Study Skills

    (2)
    This course is designed to assist students in making life-long learning decisions, particularly conducive to academic success. Students will be challenged to discover individual learning styles and implement them within their own life decisions. Enrollment is kept low to allow for individual interaction between the instructor and students, through which students are encouraged to develop their individual learning styles and the self confidence often lacking when facing the college/university environment for the first time.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    GEN 105 - Writing Skills

    (2)
    This workshop is designed for those who would like to sharpen their writing skills. The course focuses on academic writing and the objective is to provide students with the necessary writing skills to succeed in the academic environment. The course includes such topics as academic writing styles, research, and critical thinking; writing stages, strategies, and organization; writing and research; grammar and writing mechanics.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    GEN 111 - Prior Learning Assessment

    (3)


    The Prior Learning Assessment course instructs students how to petition for college credit for prior college-level learning experience. Malone University recognizes that not all learning takes place in the classroom and awards college credit for learning in two ways: (1) learning through corporate professional and technical training, military and or non-military, and (2) experiential learning through work, home, community, and other environments. This course teaches students to identify learning that can be applied toward college credit and instructs students in the petitioning process. This course is a writing course that teaches students how to write prior learning assessment essays. Students also learn how to document their prior learning, and how to use professional and technical training to apply for college credit.

     

  
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    GEN 150 - Contemporary Reading Strategies

    (2)
    This course supports students in the reading challenges of higher education. By linking to a companion course, students integrate and practice reading theory, thinking skills, metacognitive awareness exercises, and reading strategies within existing homework. Multiple intelligence theories, test-taking skills, note-taking skills, and schema building exercises are also applied to assignments.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    GEN 225 - Global Studies: (Topic)

    (3)
    This course applies to study trips sponsored by Malone University. It is fulfilled by successfully completing approved coursework in a cross-cultural setting that has been approved to fulfill the Global Connections component of the general education program. A Global Studies course explores key institutions and social dynamics that link the communities of our world and help shape the lives and cultures of people around the world.

  
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    GEN 415 - Gender Studies Independent Project

    (3)
    Independent work on a scholarly or artistic project related to gender studies under the supervision of a faculty member chosen by the student. Project will include a public presentation. A prospectus must be submitted before the beginning of the semester.

    Prerequisite(s): SOC 201 and at least 9 additional credits in the Gender Studies minor.

    Offered each semester. Enrollment limited to Gender Studies minor students.
  
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    GEN 460 - Faith in the World Seminar

    (3)
    This seminar explores what it means to think and live faithfully in our world by undertaking an in-depth study of an important issue. Each class will engage with the richness and complexity of its subject by considering diverse viewpoints and multiple academic disciplines and exploring their interconnections. Each class will also be challenged with some of the best Christian thinking about the issue. The class will maintain an atmosphere of open inquiry and discovery, and provide occasion for each student to reflect on God’s call on his/her life.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing; or junior standing and completion of all other general education requirements.

    Offered each semester.
    Examples of GEN 460 topics:
    Christianity and Psychology
    Democracy and Terrorism
    Diversity: About Loving our Differences
    God, Globalization, and Christian Worship
    History of the American Dream in Film
    Immigration
    Lessons from the Holocaust
    Living Well in a Car Culture
    Love, Sex, and Marriage
    Our Christmas Holiday: Origins, History, Purpose, and Practice
    Science and Religion
    The Spirituality and Ethics of Food and Eating
    Understanding and Responding to Loss
  
  •  

    GISP 473 - Global Practice

    (4)
    The world is becoming increasingly interconnected, allowing for information, economic, and social issues to spread across borders rapidly.  This Capstone Course for the Global and International Studies Program and social work elective will prepare students with a beginning understanding of global issues that impact both local and domestic practice with international populations.  From an interdisciplinary practice perspective, students will learn about current international issues and their impact on society. Utilizing an anti-oppressive framework, students will develop ethical skills based on principles of social justice, reconciliation, peace, and truth in preparation for both international and domestic practice in global contexts. A 40-hour domestic internship will be part of this course.

    Offered each Fall.
  
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    HON 260 - Sophomore Seminar: The Academy and You

    (1)
    The sophomore seminar will introduce students to the work of Malone faculty who are doing compelling and engaging research or creative expression. Students will also investigate interest areas that might lead to a thesis project in the future. Enrollment limited to Honors Program students.

    Offered each Fall.
  
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    HON 310 - Junior Year Colloquium I: Life of the Mind

    (1)
    A field experience designed to highlight the responsibilities of Honors Program students to their communities, particularly to foster the life of the mind in the Malone community. Students will design and schedule a significant on-campus event that stimulates the life of the mind that will be promoted and produced in HON 312.

    Prerequisite(s): HON 260 or permission of Honors Program Director.

    Offered each Fall.
  
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    HON 312 - Junior Year Colloquium II: Life of the Mind

    (1)
    Continuation of Junior Year Colloquium I. Includes promotion and production of the on-campus event designed and scheduled in HON 310. Must be taken in the same academic year as HON 310.

    Prerequisite(s): HON 310.

    Offered each Spring.
  
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    HON 370 - Honors Seminar

    (3)
    Intensive, interdisciplinary study of a selected topic not normally included in other courses. Subtitle will indicate course content. Repeatable under different subtitles. Enrollment limited to Honors Program students.

    Prerequisite(s): 45 credit hours.

    Offered as needed.
  
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    HON 490 - Honors Thesis I

    (2)
    Independent work on a scholarly or artistic project under the supervision of a faculty member chosen by the student. Project proposal must be approved by faculty member and honors director and on file with Honors Program before completion of this course. Enrollment limited to Honors Program students.

    Prerequisite(s): 75 credit hours.

  
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    HON 492 - Honors Thesis II

    (2)
    Independent work on a scholarly or artistic project under the supervision of a faculty member chosen by the student. Includes a presentation to faculty and students. Enrollment limited to Honors Program students.

    Prerequisite(s): HON 490.


Intervention Specialist

  
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    SPED 243 - Inclusion and the Schools

    (3)
    Emphasis on the philosophical, historical, and legal foundations of special education with particular consideration given to the principles and practices of inclusion. A personal philosophy regarding the acceptance and professional commitment to individuals with exceptional learning needs will be developed. Includes 20 field hours.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 112, 232.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    SPED 253 - Nature and Needs of Learners with Mild/Moderate Exceptionalities

    (3)
    An in-depth examination of the etiologies, identification criteria, characteristics, and needs of individuals with mild and moderate educational needs including those with learning disabilities, mild/ moderate mental retardation, emotional and behavioral disorders, and developmental disabilities. Emphasized are ways in which to plan and implement developmentally and individually appropriate curricula and instructional practices based on knowledge of individual children and their educational needs, the family, the community, and curricula goals and content.

    Prerequisite(s): SPED 243.

    Offered each Spring.
  
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    SPED 280 - Children with Exceptionalities in Early Childhood Education

    (3)
    Designed to provide a thorough knowledge base related to the nature and needs of children, pre-kindergarten through third grade who are at risk, gifted, or who have mild/moderate educational needs. Participants use a variety of informal and formal assessment instruments and procedures, including observational methods, to make decisions about children’s learning and development. Emphasized are ways in which to plan and implement developmentally and individually appropriate curricula and instructional practices based on knowledge of individual children and their educational needs, the family, the community, and curricula goals and content.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 245; SPED 243 (Required only for Early Childhood Education Program).

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    SPED 293 - Emergent and Early Reading Instruction

    (3)
    An overview of theories of language acquisition and development of reading. Emphasis is placed upon the development of a balanced literacy program including, but not limited to, teaching strategies for the sequential evolvement of spelling skills, grammar skills (oral and written), handwriting, and the use of various cueing systems to enhance reading comprehension. Attention is given to the reading and writing process and to the model/methods appropriate for reading instruction. Intervention strategies for children with mild/moderate educational needs are introduced. Includes 20 field hours.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 252.

    Cross-listed with EDUC 293.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    SPED 352 - Management Strategies in Education

    (3)


    Course content focuses on conceptual models of discipline, management methods and strategies, systematic interventions, and classroom procedures/routines that lead all students, including students with mild to moderate educational needs, to make constructive social/behavior choices. Other topics include legal requirements and social/behavior planning in the IEP process, methods to teach socials skills, and strategies to motivate students. Ethical considerations inherent in behavior management are also considered.

     

    Prerequisite(s): SPED 243.

    Offered each semester.

  
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    SPED 357 - Content Reading Strategies

    (3)
    This course provides a multidisciplinary support of reading development with an emphasis on content area reading. Attention is given to the development of skills in comprehension, vocabulary, word identification, the reading and writing process, grammar skills, and effective strategies for reading instruction across the content areas. Various speech and language patterns, dialects, and other issues of language diversity are considered. Includes 20 field hours.

    Prerequisite(s): SPED 243.

    Cross-listed with EDUC 357.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    SPED 376 - Intervention Strategies for Learners with Disabilities in Middle and Secondary Schools

    (3)
    Focus is on general and specialized curriculum and methods used for teaching students with mild/moderate educational needs in the middle and secondary school, with adaptations that facilitate inclusion. Curricula and intervention strategies, including the use of technology, for the development of cognitive, academic, social, language, affective, career, and functional life skills necessary for independent, community, and personal living and employment are examined. IEP and lesson plans are developed in transition, academic, adaptive behavior, and vocational areas. Field and clinical experiences allow students to tutor middle or secondary students with mild/ moderate learning and/or behavior problems. Includes 20 field hours.

    Prerequisite(s): SPED 253.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    SPED 405 - Evaluation Strategies for Learners with Disabilities

    (3)
    An overview and analysis of the various evaluation strategies used to inform placement and intervention decisions for students with mild/moderate educational needs. Participants become familiar with a wide range of individual and group assessment tools including those used to diagnosis learning problems in the areas of math, science, social studies, and language arts. Particular emphasis is placed on the Intervention Based Multi-Factored Evaluation (IBMFE), along with assessment techniques such as life space interviewing. Course fee.

    Prerequisite(s): SPED 253.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    SPED 425 - Literacy Assessment and Instruction

    (3)
    An overview of standard and alternative assessments designed for the identification of reading difficulties with attention given to specific intervention strategies, including the use of technology. Candidates learn how to assist and accommodate readers with speech, linguistics, and cultural differences. Case studies, the development of individualized education plans (IEPs), and the 504 plan in reading is a significant focus for 20 field hours.

    Prerequisite(s): SPED 293.

    Cross-listed with EDUC 425.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    SPED 445 - Integrated Social Studies and Language Arts for Children

    (4)
    Explores the principles, techniques and resources for teaching language arts in the context of social studies to children ages three through eight and kindergarten through grade three, incorporating technology and other non-print media. Course work includes the examination of strategies for selecting, integrating, and translating knowledge and methods from history, geography, and social science disciplines appropriate for early childhood. Planning an integrated social studies curriculum and providing intervention for children with various educational needs are emphasized. Attends to Ohio academic content standards for social studies and English/language arts. Includes 20 field hours.

    Prerequisite(s): SPED 253. Co-requisite(s): EDUC 405; SPED 447

    Cross-listed with EDUC 445.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    SPED 447 - Integrated Math and Science for Children

    (4)
    Presents the current developments and methods of teaching math and science to children, pre-kindergarten through grade three, with content and learning activities reflecting national standards and the Ohio academic content standards for mathematics and science. Emphasis is placed upon materials, techniques, and research-based practice for effective instruction of content, process, and real-world applications. Intervention strategies are developed and practiced to address the learning needs of children with mild/moderate educational needs across various placements, with consideration given to the challenge of providing individualized instruction in general education classes. Course fee. Includes 20 field hours.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 112; SPED 253; general education science elective. Co-requisite(s): EDUC 405; SPED 445

    Cross-listed with EDUC 447.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    SPED 462 - Language Development and Differences

    (3)
    This course is designed to prepare candidates to identify students with language differences and to effectively design and implement instruction for students with language disorders or differences. Topics include normal acquisition of speech and language from infancy through adolescence, developmental milestones, theories related to language acquisition, socio-cultural influences, differences in typical development, English Language Learners, and strategies and adaptations to facilitate language development and learner success. 20 hours of Reading Endorsement internship with a culturally/linguistically diverse population.

    Prerequisite(s): SPED 243; EDUC/SPED 293.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    SPED 496 - Special Education (K-12) Student Teaching

    (12)
    For those seeking the Intervention Specialist license. A full-time clinical experience providing opportunities to observe, plan, conduct, and evaluate instruction in a school setting and receive professional feedback from university supervisors and experienced cooperating teachers in the appropriate licensure area, equally divided between two placements across the licensure area, for a minimum of 15 weeks (minimum - 450 clock hours). Attendance at additional duties associated with the teaching role is expected (i.e., parent-teacher conferences, professional meetings, etc.). Those registering for student teaching must also register for  . Application for student teaching should be made in November preceding the academic year in which student teaching is to be completed.

    Prerequisite(s): Acceptance as a candidate for clinical experience and satisfactory completion of all professional education course work. Co-requisite(s): EDUC 460

    Offered each semester.

Journalism

  
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    JOUR 220 - Context of Journalism

    (3)
    Basic concept of the mass medium of journalism in America; analysis of forces and institutions affecting medium behavior and the resulting quality of performance.

    Prerequisite(s): COMM 110.

    Offered each semester.
 

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