2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    Aug 09, 2022  
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Degree Completion for RNs

  
  •  

    NRN 425 - Nursing Research

    (3)
    The development of nursing knowledge is necessary for the profession of nursing. Research supports this knowledge development and provides the professional with skills to advance the practice of nursing. This course provides the student with an overview of knowledge development and the research process. Selected nursing study reports are reviewed and critiqued. Students are assisted in a literature review and the formulation of a research problem. A research proposal is completed.

  
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    NRN 430 - Community and the Nursing Process

    (4)
    This course applies the nursing process, based on the Neuman Systems Model, to persons, families, groups, and communities with a focus on primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of prevention. Selected theories pertaining to families and community are applied in homes, schools, public health, and other community settings.

  
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    NRN 431 - Management and Leadership in Complex Environments

    (4)
    Management and leadership are addressed within the health care system. Total quality management and Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) are discussed and related to the Neuman Systems Model. Evaluations of actual and hypothetical management and leadership situations are completed. Self-evaluations are completed relating to nurse manager roles and the continuation of professional nurse career plans. Clinical application of learned concepts occurs in selected health care settings.

  
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    NRN 461 - Capstone: Liberal Arts and Nursing

    (3)
    A capstone course that assists students in the integration of previous liberal arts, science, and nursing education in order to formulate and implement a personal philosophy of nursing. This course emphasizes a professional commitment in the areas of accountability in personal practice, ensuring the quality of health care practices, and the promotion of nursing as a profession. Nursing professionals facilitate the exploration of current issues and trends in nursing.


Economics

  
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    ECON 202 - Principles of Macroeconomics

    (3)
    A study of macroeconomics taking a broad view of the American economy, exploring topics such as money, total output and spending, national income, inflation, unemployment, and economic stabilization methods. This course meets the American Cultures and Institutions requirement of the general education program.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    ECON 203 - Principles of Microeconomics

    (3)
    A study of microeconomics dealing with individual and social choices, economic analysis, supply and demand, and price determination. Theories of specialization, trade, income distribution, and the optimization decisions of business are also studied.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    ECON 347 - International Political Economy

    (3)
    Examines how states and markets interacted globally in the modern era, from the “rise of Europe” to the present day. The course traces the emergence of global finance, international trade, industrial production, domestic economic development, and ecological issues. Special effort is made to discover how the assumptions of classical liberalism, globalism, and mercantilism show up in current events.

    Prerequisite(s): POL 201, 212 or permission of the instructor.

    Cross-listed with POL 347.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    ECON 353 - Public Finance

    (3)
    A survey of the field of government finance; expenditures, revenues and debt management; and the effects of these governmental activities upon other segments of the economy.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 202.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
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    ECON 380 - Entrepreneurship and the American Enterprise System

    (3)
    This course will focus on the role of entrepreneurship in the American enterprise system. Entrepreneurship should be considered to be more than just starting a business. The perspective of this class will be to view entrepreneurship as a process that adds economic and social value to society. The economic and societal value of government involvement and regulation will also be considered. Students will participate in activities that illustrate the entrepreneurship process.

    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or higher.

    Cross-listed with BUS 380.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    ECON 401 - Money and Banking

    (3)
    A study of the development and function of American monetary and banking practices.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 202, 203.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    ECON 450 - Advanced Topics

    (1-3)
    An opportunity for the superior student to pursue, under supervision, an area of special interest either on his/her own initiative or in a seminar group. Open to juniors or seniors in this area who have completed or are taking regularly scheduled courses.

    Enrollment by permission of the Department Chair.

Education

  
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    EDUC 112 - Foundations of Education

    (3)
    An introduction to the teaching profession including an intensive study of social, historical, philosophical, and economic factors affecting contemporary educational practices and problems in American society. A personal philosophy of education is developed including the relationship between a Christian world view and professional practice. Course fee. Includes 20 field hours.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 121; COMM 110 recommended.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    EDUC 114 - Exploratory Field Experience

    (1)
    Required of all transfer students pursuing licensure. Course includes required content, field experience, and assessment tools not evidenced in the Foundations course accepted in transfer. Credit required as a prerequisite for enrollment in advanced education courses (EDUC 300 and above).




    Offered each semester. Grading is credit (CR) or no credit (NC).
  
  •  

    EDUC 232 - Psychology of Human Learning

    (3)
    A course which focuses on the psychology of human development and learning important to the understanding of those influences which affect when an individual is ready to learn and how learning is maximized. Cognitive and linguistic development, personal and social development, and diversity of development is addressed along with various learning theories to provide the basis for principles of effective instruction across developmental stages and educational needs.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 121.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    EDUC 245 - Teaching the Young Child

    (3)
    An overview of appropriate practices which support physical, social, emotional, language, cognitive, and aesthetic development of all children from birth through age eight. The impact of classroom physical environment (including technology), schedule, routines, transitions, and external aspects such as family and cultural backgrounds are presented. Includes 20 field hours.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 112, 232.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    EDUC 252 - Phonics

    (3)
    The introduction to and development of phonics skills including terminology, concepts, and an understanding of the essential role of phonics in the reading process. Emphasis is placed upon the application of phonemic awareness for effective reading instruction.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 112. Co-requisite(s): EDUC 232

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    EDUC 262 - Instructional Technology

    (3)
    Designed to develop a working knowledge of how technology, including various forms of media, can be used in the classroom to serve the diverse needs of students. Understanding and skill is developed in using a variety of computer hardware and software, and integrating instructional media techniques into adaptable, usable teaching strategies for the elementary, middle, and secondary school classroom. Consideration is given to social, ethical, and human issues related to technology. Course fee.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 232.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    EDUC 270 - Expressive Arts for Young Children

    (3)
    The exploration and application of creative and aesthetic expression across the early childhood education curriculum with emphasis on art, music, drama, and movement. The focus is on designing environments and teaching methods which value play, small group projects, openended questions, group discussion, problem solving, cooperative learning, and inquiry experiences. Course fee.

    Offered each semester. Prerequisite for Early Childhood Education majors: EDUC 245
  
  •  

    EDUC 293 - Emergent and Early Reading Instruction

    (3)
    An overview of theories of language acquisition and development of reading. Emphasis is placed upon the development of a balanced literacy program including, but not limited to, teaching strategies for the sequential evolvement of spelling skills, grammar skills (oral and written), handwriting, and the use of various cueing systems to enhance reading comprehension. Attention is given to the reading and writing process and to the model/methods appropriate for reading instruction. Includes 20 field hours.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 252.

    Cross-listed with SPED 293.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    EDUC 300 - Children’s Literature

    (3)
    This course is designed to provide a survey of literary genres, historical aspects, current trends, and critical stances related to children’s literature. Emphasis is placed on both the literary study of these bodies of work and their uses in educational settings. Assigned readings will relate to all major world cultures (African, European, Asian, Middle Eastern, Hispanic, and American), various age and ability groups, and to both male and female student readers.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 232.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    EDUC 305 - Adolescent Literature

    (3)
    This course deals with the critical evaluation of adolescent and young adult books and their appropriateness to the needs and interests of students at the middle and secondary school levels. Students complete assigned readings of various genre that are reflective of all major world cultures including African, European, Asian, Middle Eastern, Hispanic, and American. Students will read complete texts that appeal to both male and female adolescent and young adult readers.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 232.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    EDUC 312 - Principles of Secondary School Instruction

    (3)
    This course examines the physical, social, emotional, intellectual, and moral development of the late adolescent and young adult and the corresponding implications for curriculum, instruction, and school organization. An analysis of secondary school curriculum development and procedures involving planning, instructional strategies, and classroom management are addressed with attention given to critical issues in secondary school education. Effective principles related to motivation and self-analysis of teaching competencies are also included. Field experience (30 hrs.) is included.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 232.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    EDUC 325 - Nature and Needs of Adolescents

    (3)
    Examines the physical, social, emotional, intellectual, and moral development of early adolescents and the corresponding implications for curriculum, instruction, and school organization for middle childhood education.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 232.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    EDUC 326 - Communication, Collaboration, and Advocacy

    (3)
    Emphasizes essential knowledge and strategies concerning diverse family needs and how to address them through effective communication, decision making, and professional and community relationships. Avenues of advocacy for all students, regardless of individual differences and the various roles that support students and families across all levels of education are stressed. Includes ethical and professional practices for confidential and responsible communication.

    Prerequisite(s): SPED 243.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    EDUC 357 - Content Reading Strategies

    (3)
    This course provides a multidisciplinary support of reading development with an emphasis on content area reading. Attention is given to the development of skills in comprehension, vocabulary, word identification, the reading and writing process, grammar skills, and effective strategies for reading instruction across the content areas. Various speech and language patterns, dialects, and other issues of language diversity are considered. Includes 20 field hours.

    Prerequisite(s): SPED 243.

    Cross-listed with SPED 357.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    EDUC 385 - Education and Issues in the Middle Grades

    (2)
    A study of the middle school concept, its philosophy, issues, and distinctive components and characteristics. Principles of curriculum development, classroom management, differential instruction, and effective communication and collaboration in middle school education are covered. Includes 20 field hours.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 325.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    EDUC 405 - Applied Instructional Technology

    (1)
    Project-oriented course designed to promote the utilization of technological tools at all teaching levels and integration within all content areas. The emphasis is upon the purposeful instructional use of technology integrated with media materials for an enriched classroom setting. Taken concurrently with a methods course.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 262.

    This course has a co-requisite methods course. Check the licensure area program guide for the designated methods course.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    EDUC 415 - Assessment in Education

    (3)
    Principles and techniques of assessment in education, including descriptive statistics such as measures of central tendency, variability, and relationship are studied in the context of assessment, including statistical indices for test validity and reliability. Focus is on contemporary measurement and evaluation techniques including the interpretation of standardized test scores and the development of authentic assessment activities and appropriate scoring procedures. Social, legal, and ethical implications of testing are included.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 232 and Junior standing.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    EDUC 424 - Teaching Integrated Mathematics in the Secondary School

    (3)
    A comprehensive methods course which integrates various branches of mathematics with applications for mathematics instruction at the secondary level. This course, along with EDUC 405, is taken with 40 hours of field and clinical experiences. Attends to NCTM standards and Ohio academic content standards for mathematics.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 312. Co-requisite(s): EDUC 405

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    EDUC 425 - Literacy Assessment and Instruction

    (3)
    An overview of standard and alternative assessments designed for the identification of reading difficulties with attention given to specific intervention strategies, including the use of technology. Strategies for assisting and accommodating readers with speech, linguistics, and cultural differences. Case studies, the development of individualized education plans (IEPs), and the 504 plan in reading is a significant focus for 20 field hours.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 293.

    Cross-listed with SPED 425.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    EDUC 434 - Teaching Integrated Social Studies in the Secondary School

    (3)
    A comprehensive social studies methods course which integrates the broad areas of history, economics, political science, and sociology, with applications for instruction at the secondary level. This course, along with EDUC 405, is taken with 40 hours of field and clinical experiences. Attends to NCSS standards and Ohio academic content standards for social studies.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 312. Co-requisite(s): EDUC 405

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    EDUC 436 - Methods and Materials in Health Education

    (3)
    The identification of the fundamental processes, techniques, and instructional methods related to health education in the schools. Designed to prepare students to develop lesson plans, write measurable objectives and evaluate lessons for students PreK-12. This course, along with EDUC 405, is taken with 40 hours of field and clinical experiences.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 312. Co-requisite(s): EDUC 405

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    EDUC 437 - Teaching Integrated Language Arts in the Secondary School

    (3)
    A comprehensive methods course which integrates the broad areas of language, writing/composition, reading and literature, and media, with applications for instruction at the secondary level. Attends to NCTE standards and Ohio academic content standards for English/language arts. This course, along with EDUC 405, is taken with 40 hours of field and clinical experiences.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 312. Co-requisite(s): EDUC 405

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    EDUC 439 - Methods and Materials in Spanish Education

    (3)
    A comprehensive examination of effective strategies in Spanish Education (PreK-12) with specific practical classroom experience to identify the fundamental processes, techniques, instructional methods and materials for teaching Spanish in grades PreK through 12. This course, along with EDUC 405, is taken with 40 hours of field and clinical experiences.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 312. Co-requisite(s): EDUC 405

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    EDUC 443 - Teaching Integrated Science in the Secondary School

    (3)
    A comprehensive methods course which integrates the different subject areas contained within the sciences, with applications for science instruction at the secondary level. Attends to NSTA standards and Ohio academic content standards for science. This course, along with EDUC 405, is taken with 40 hours of field and clinical experiences.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 312. Co-requisite(s): EDUC 405

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    EDUC 445 - Integrated Social Studies and Language Arts for Children

    (4)
    Explores the principles, techniques, and resources for teaching language arts in the context of social studies to children pre-kindergarten through grade three, incorporating technology and other non-print media. Course work includes the examination of strategies for selecting, integrating, and translating knowledge and methods from history, geography, and social science disciplines appropriate for early childhood. Planning an integrated social studies curriculum and providing intervention for children with various educational needs, including the gifted, are emphasized. Includes 20 field hours. Attends to Ohio academic content standards for social studies and English/language arts.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 355. Co-requisite(s): EDUC 405, 447

    Cross-listed with SPED 445.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    EDUC 447 - Integrated Math and Science for Children

    (4)
    Presents the current developments and methods of teaching math and science to children pre-kindergarten through grade three, with content and learning activities reflecting national standards and the Ohio academic content standards for mathematics and science. Emphasis is placed upon materials, techniques, and research-based practice for effective instruction of content, process, and real-world applications. Intervention strategies for children who are at-risk, gifted, or those with mild/moderate educational needs, including the gifted, are practiced. Includes 20 field hours. Course fee.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 112; general education science elective. Co-requisite(s): EDUC 405, 445

    Cross-listed with SPED 447.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    EDUC 452 - Teaching Mathematics in the Middle Grades

    (2)
    Examines effective strategies for instruction and evaluation in middle level mathematics and provides the opportunity to apply strategies to meet the diverse needs of students through middle school field experience. Attends to NCTM standards and Ohio academic content standards for mathematics. This course, along with EDUC 405, is taken with 30 hours of field and clinical experiences in the middle grades.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 385. Co-requisite(s): EDUC 405

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    EDUC 453 - Teaching Science in the Middle Grades

    (2)
    Examines effective strategies for instruction and evaluation in middle level science and provides the opportunity to apply strategies to meet the diverse needs of students through middle school field experience. Attends to NSTA standards and Ohio academic content standards for science. This course, along with EDUC 405, is taken with 30 hours of field and clinical experiences in the middle grades.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 385. Co-requisite(s): EDUC 405

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    EDUC 454 - Teaching Social Studies in the Middle Grades

    (2)
    This course examines effective strategies for instruction and evaluation in middle level social studies and provides the opportunity to apply strategies to meet the diverse needs of students through middle school field experience. Attends to NCSS standards and Ohio academic content standards for social studies. This course, along with EDUC 405, is taken with 30 hours of field and clinical experiences in the middle grades.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 385. Co-requisite(s): EDUC 405

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    EDUC 455 - Teaching Language Arts in the Middle Grades

    (2)
    This course examines effective strategies for instruction and evaluation in middle level language arts and provides the opportunity to apply strategies to meet the diverse needs of students through middle school field experience. Attends to NCTE standards and Ohio academic content standards for English/language arts. This course, along with EDUC 405, is taken with 30 hours of field and clinical experiences in the middle grades.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 385. Co-requisite(s): EDUC 405

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    EDUC 460 - Student Teaching Seminar

    (1)
    The student teaching seminar meets once a week during the student teaching semester. The seminar encourages reflection and provides opportunities for students to interact regarding their student teaching experiences. Discussions on issues and trends affecting the profession and preparations for the professional role will occur. The professional portfolio and student teaching work sample capstones are developed and submitted.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    EDUC 472 - Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary School

    (3)
    The identification of the fundamental processes, techniques, and instructional methods related to physical education at the secondary level. This course, along with EDUC 405, is taken with 40 hours of field and clinical experiences.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 312. Co-requisite(s): EDUC 405

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    EDUC 492 - Early Childhood Student Teaching

    (12)
    For those seeking the Early Childhood Education license. A full-time clinical experience providing opportunities to observe, plan, conduct, and evaluate instruction in a school setting and receive professional feedback from university supervisors and experienced cooperating teachers in the appropriate licensure area for a minimum of 15 weeks (minimum - 450 clock hours). Attendance at additional duties associated with the teaching role is expected (i.e., parent-teacher conferences, professional meetings, etc.). Those registering for student teaching must also register for  . Application for student teaching should be made in November preceding the academic year in which student teaching is to be completed.

    Prerequisite(s): Acceptance as a candidate for clinical experience and satisfactory completion of all professional education course work. Co-requisite(s): EDUC 460

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    EDUC 493 - Middle Childhood Student Teaching

    (12)
    For those seeking the Middle Childhood Education license. A full-time clinical experience providing opportunities to observe, plan, conduct, and evaluate instruction in a school setting and receive professional feedback from university supervisors and experienced cooperating teachers in the appropriate licensure area, equally divided between both concentration areas, for a minimum of 15 weeks (minimum - 450 clock hours). Attendance at additional duties associated with the teaching role is expected (i.e., parent-teacher conferences, professional meetings, etc.). Those registering for student teaching must also register for  . Application for student teaching should be made in November preceding the academic year in which student teaching is to be completed.

    Prerequisite(s): Acceptance as a candidate for clinical experience and satisfactory completion of all professional education course work. Co-requisite(s): EDUC 460

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    EDUC 495 - Multi-Age (PreK-12) Student Teaching

    (12)
    For those choosing from among multi-age licensure areas such as Health Education, Music Education, Physical Education, Spanish Education, or Visual Arts Education. A full-time clinical experience providing opportunities to observe, plan, conduct, and evaluate instruction in a school setting and receive professional feedback from university supervisors and experienced cooperating teachers in the appropriate licensure area, equally divided between two placements across the licensure area, for a minimum of 15 weeks (minimum - 450 clock hours). Attendance at additional duties associated with the teaching role is expected (i.e., parent-teacher conferences, professional meetings, etc.). Those registering for student teaching must also register for  . Application for student teaching should be made in November preceding the academic year in which student teaching is to be completed.

    Prerequisite(s): Acceptance as a candidate for clinical experience and satisfactory completion of all professional education course work. Co-requisite(s): EDUC 460

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    EDUC 497 - Adolescent to Young Adult Student Teaching

    (12)
    For those choosing from among Adolescent and Young Adult licensure areas such as Integrated Language Arts, Integrated Mathematics, Integrated Social Studies, Integrated Science, Life Science/Chemistry Education, and Physical Science. A full-time clinical experience providing opportunities to observe, plan, conduct, and evaluate instruction in a school setting and receive professional feedback from university supervisors and experienced cooperating teachers in the appropriate licensure area, equally divided between two placements across the licensure area, for a minimum of 15 weeks (minimum - 450 clock hours). Attendance at additional duties associated with the teaching role is expected (i.e., parent-teacher conferences, professional meetings, etc.). Those registering for student teaching must also register for  . Application for student teaching should be made in November preceding the academic year in which student teaching is to be completed.

    Prerequisite(s): Acceptance as a candidate for clinical experience and satisfactory completion of all professional education course work. Co-requisite(s): EDUC 460

    Offered each semester.

Educational Ministries

  
  •  

    EDMN 101 - Models of Christian Ministry

    (1)
    Spiritual and professional foundations for ministry within church and para-church organizations are studied. Students examine options related to ministry and begin to develop a personal theology related to their own spiritual development and ministry.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    EDMN 102 - Foundations of Youth, Family, and Sports Ministry

    (3)
    An introduction to ministries within the church and para-church organizations. Students examine biblical, theological, philosophical, and psychological foundations, with the goal of establishing a personal theology of ministry. Curriculum, teaching methods and organization within the church are examined for all age groups. Students are required to be engaged in a practical experience while enrolled in this course.

    Prerequisite(s): EDMN 101 or permission of instructor.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    EDMN 204 - Ministry with Children

    (2)
    An examination of the social, emotional, cognitive, moral, and spiritual development of children with an emphasis on church ministry to children in the context of their relationships to the family. Resources available to children’s ministry will be evaluated with an emphasis on creative methods and ministries designed to meet the needs of children.

    Prerequisite or Co-requisite: EDMN 102.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    EDMN 205 - Ministry with Adults and Families

    (2)
    A study of the characteristics of adults with a focus on encouraging spiritual maturity and Christian service. Non-traditional and traditional families will be studied with strategies developed to minister to adults in various life stages.

    Prerequisite(s): EDMN 102.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    EDMN 234 - Evangelism of Youth

    (3)
    A study of how to appraise the youth culture and establish contact with youth with the goal of evangelization. An emphasis will be placed upon understanding various youth cultures found in urban, suburban, and rural settings. Students will be required to participate in a practicum.

    Prerequisite(s): EDMN 102.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    EDMN 235 - Discipleship of Youth

    (3)
    A study of spiritual formation and discipleship of contemporary youth through church and para-church organizations. Attention will be given to mentoring and small group discipleship. Methods for group Bible study and developing youth leadership will be examined. Students will be required to participate in a practicum.

    Prerequisite(s): EDMN 102.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    EDMN 321 - Creative Bible Teaching

    (2)
    A study of creative teaching methods designed to meet the needs of all age levels in the church. Special consideration will be given to communicating with adolescents.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    EDMN 331 - Models of Youth Ministry

    (3)
    A study of various models used in youth ministry by church and para-church organizations. Students will develop a conceptual framework for youth ministry including purpose, strategies, methods, and evaluation.

    Prerequisite(s): EDMN 234, 235.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    EDMN 353 - Church Organization and Administration

    (3)
    A study of the basic principles, patterns, and problems in the organization and administration of the total program of the church, including a consideration of new concepts in dynamics, lay leadership and responsibility, and principles of human interaction.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing.

    Offered on demand.
  
  •  

    EDMN 412 - Cross-Cultural Ministries in the 21st Century

    (3)
    A study of principles, goals, strategies, and finances related to current practice in cross-cultural ministries. The course will introduce students to the complex issues related to the interdisciplinary process of entering a culture other than their own with the purpose of initiating an effective ministry. Students will study transcultural issues and examine their own commitment and preparation to make contextual adjustment required to accurately and effectively communicate biblical truth in culturally sensitive ways.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    EDMN 421 - Communicating the Christian Faith

    (3)
    This is a workshop on communicating the gospel message. The history, structure, forms, and techniques of communicating through public prayer, liturgy, a variety of worship settings, and the sermon are studied and practiced. This course cannot be taken on a tutorial basis.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    EDMN 422 - Recreational Ministry

    (3)
    The study of the outdoors as a means of facilitating spiritual, social, and physical growth. The emphasis is upon camping skills, but will also include topics such as canoeing, caving, and initiatives. Attention will be given to the organization and leadership of these activities.

    Prerequisite(s): EDMN 101, 102.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    EDMN 430 - Christian Ministries Internship

    (1-3)
    This is a carefully supervised application of the content of the curriculum in the ministry of a church or para-church organization. Internship may begin at the sophomore level and with approval at the freshman level. Guidelines and procedures will be provided at the time that the internship is undertaken.

    Offered each semester. This graded internship is repeatable to 7 hours.
  
  •  

    EDMN 434 - Leadership and Staff Dynamics

    (3)
    A comprehensive examination of leadership principles and the dynamics, responsibilities, and relationships within the staff of a Christian ministry. Attention will be given to planning, organizing, budgeting, ethics, decision making, recruiting volunteers, conflict resolution, and evaluation.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    EDMN 435 - Cross-Cultural Practicum

    (3)
    Students are required to have direct engagement in a ministry being conducted in a culture other than their own. This transcultural ministry experience must include a three-part process. Students will study and write about the ministry and the culture before engaging in the ministry. After participating in the ministry, students will write a theological and cultural analysis of the ministry as it is conducted in the culture. Credits may be earned in any combination but limited to three.

    Offered Summers.
  
  •  

    EDMN 441 - Curriculum and Instruction

    (2)
    A study of curriculum theory, development, and evaluation as related to Christian education. Attention is given to instructional design based upon principles of human development and learning. Resources and teaching methods will be developed for the various ages within the Church.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    EDMN 450 - Advanced Topics

    (1-3)
    An opportunity for superior students to pursue a subject of special interest on their own initiative or in a seminar group. Open only to juniors or seniors who are majors in this area and who have completed or are taking regularly scheduled courses.

    Enrollment by permission of the Department Chair.
  
  •  

    EDMN 461 - Ministries in an Urban Environment

    (3)
    This course in designed to help students understand relevant issues related to participating in a transforming ministry in an urban environment. The challenges of urbanization, multiculturalism, marginalization, and poverty will be examined with the purpose of helping students understand how the church can fulfill its mission in a global city. Students will be encouraged to develop a personal theology of urban ministry and develop skills related to urban analysis.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    EDMN 463 - Integrating Music and Ministry

    (3)
    Students will study how biblical and theological principles provide essential foundations for ministry through music and worship. Students will develop a personal theology for music ministry which has theological integrity and programmatic quality.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing.

    Cross-listed with MUS 463.

    Offered at discretion of Department of Music.

English

  
  •  

    ENG 120 - Elements of English

    (3)
    Emphasizes writing as a recursive process and the interconnected nature of reading and writing. Offers practice with organizing and developing ideas, and provides opportunities to refine drafting, revising, and editing skills through in-class workshops and one-on-one tutoring sessions in the campus writing center. Grading is limited to A through C- and No Credit. Open to all students; required for those with below average score on English examination (ACT score or other test).

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    ENG 145 - English Composition

    (3)


    Emphasizes writing as a recursive process and offers practice in reading and responding to expository essays. Students explore language as a means of discovering and communicating truth. Grading is limited to A through C- and No Credit. 

     

    Prerequisite(s): ACT English score ≥ 19, or departmental permission, or grade of C- or higher in ENG 120.

    Offered each semester.

  
  •  

    ENG 200 - Literature in Society

    (3)
    Examination of enduring issues through the evaluation and interpretation of a variety of literature from different critical approaches.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 145 (Not available for credit/proficiency by exam).

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    ENG 206 - Language and Literature Seminar

    (1)
    In this seminar students will examine how the disciplinary tools developed during a study of language and literature can be used to pursue an integrated understanding of their lives, faith, and world. In addition, students will explore ways to engage fully in their studies and how their discipline will prepare them for lifelong learning and growth, and of career and calling.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    ENG 230 - Foundations of American Literature

    (4)
    This course studies important works, movements, and contexts of American literature, and explores the purposes and methods of literary study.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 200.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    ENG 231 - Introduction to Creative Writing

    (3)
    An exploration of imaginative writing and the writing life: literary art and the creative process, techniques of poetry and narrative fiction, readings in modern and contemporary literature.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    ENG 240 - Foundations of British Literature

    (4)
    This course studies important works, movements, and contexts of British literature, and explores the purposes and methods of literary study.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 200.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    ENG 260 - Professional Writing

    (3)
    Emphasizes the rhetorical principles and writing practices necessary for producing effective business letters, memos, reports, and collaborative projects in professional contexts.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 145, 200.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    ENG 270 - World Cinema

    (3)
    Students will view and analyze western and non-western movies, taking narrative cinema as the principal conduit into the lives, times, and cultures of other persons. As a foundation for film studies, we will explore the artistic and technical components of the cinema: narrative, mise en scène, cinematography, editing, and so on. Through this engagement with world cinema, the course will underline the connection between analyzing our experiences of film and a richer, more sophisticated enjoyment of it.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 145.

    Cross-listed with COMM 270.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    ENG 306 - Teaching Grammar and Composition

    (3)
    An overview of composition theories, with consideration given to major pedagogical approaches, research on English Language Learners (ELL), “basic” writers, constructivist and collaborative learning, and issues pertaining to the teaching of revision and the conventions of the English language.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 200.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    ENG 311 - Essay Writing

    (3)
    An advanced writing course designed to use essay writing as a means of inquiry, exploration, and dialogue with sources. Students will analyze and critique the rhetorical strategies and techniques used by both classical and contemporary essayists and then apply these in a variety of forms such as the narrative, analytical, and persuasive essay.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 200.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    ENG 315 - Style and Usage

    (3)
    A writing-intensive course that focuses on assisting the writer in developing an effective style and gaining control over the conventions of the language.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 200.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    ENG 322 - World Literature

    (3)
    This course emphasizes a close reading of texts from diverse historical, cultural, and religious contexts. Through this literature we can explore the key institutions and social dynamics that link the nations and communities of our world so that we can understand our commonalities and come to terms with those with whom we share this world.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 200.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    ENG 325 - Writers Series Seminar

    (1)
    Read and study the works of writers visiting campus with the University Writers Series. Opportunities to meet with the writers for discussion and instruction will be arranged whenever possible. Repeatable to 6 hours. Creative Writing majors must repeat to 2 hours.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    ENG 331 - Poetry Writing

    (3)
    A writing workshop focused on poetic craft and tradition. Readings in modern and contemporary poetry as well as criticism and theory combine with intensive work in the practice of writing poems.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 231.

    Offered each Fall beginning Fall 2013.
  
  •  

    ENG 332 - Fiction Writing

    (3)
    A writing workshop devoted to the art of fiction. Diverse readings across the spectrum of narrative prose—classic stories, experimental forms, craft essays by writers—augment student writing.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 231.

    Offered each Spring beginning Spring 2014.
  
  •  

    ENG 350 - Advanced Topics

    (1-3)
    Individual or small group study. Open only to junior or senior majors in this area who have completed or are taking regularly scheduled courses.

    Enrollment by permission of the Department Chair.
  
  •  

    ENG 352 - Shakespeare

    (3)


    A representative sampling of Shakespeare’s plays and poetic verse.

     

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 200.

    Offered Spring 2014 and alternate Spring semesters.

  
  •  

    ENG 360 - Genre Studies

    (3)
    Intensive study of a specific literary genre such as poetry, drama, short story, the novel, or autobiography. Subtitle will indicate course content. Repeatable, maximum 6 credits under different subtitles.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 200.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    ENG 365 - Author Studies

    (3)
    Intensive study of an author or group of authors. Subtitle will indicate course content. Repeatable, maximum 6 credits under different subtitles.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 200.

    Offered Spring 2015 and alternate Spring semesters.
  
  •  

    ENG 381 - Introduction to Linguistics

    (3)
    A study of the historical, social, and biological aspects of language to discover the commonalities among all languages of the world, including speech sounds, word formations and meanings, and grammar.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 200.

    Offered each Fall.
  
  •  

    ENG 390 - African American Literature and Culture

    (3)
    This course examines a selection of literature written by African Americans in an effort to gain greater understanding of various aesthetic, cultural, political, and social issues. Students will explore several central motifs: the African roots of African-American culture, the importance of literacy and “telling lives,” the journey toward freedom and equality, and the inter-relationship between African- American cultural traditions and the larger landscape of American culture.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 200.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    ENG 395 - Women Writers

    (3)
    An examination of literature written by women with emphasis on cultural, aesthetic, and theoretical issues.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 200.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    ENG 396 - Applied Writing: Literary Publishing

    (1)
    Study and practice elements of small press publishing including editing, design, and work for the literary magazine. Grading is limited to credit or no credit. Repeatable to 6 hours. If repeated, a maximum of 2 hours may be counted toward the requirements for the Creative Writing major; a maximum of 3 hours may be counted toward the requirements for the English major. Creative Writing majors must repeat to 2 hours, but may substitute ENG 397 or 398 for 1 of the 2 hours. Creative Writing minors must take 1 hour.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    ENG 397 - Applied Writing: Writing Center

    (1)
    Study current approaches to peer tutoring across the disciplines while working in the Writing Center. Grading is limited to credit or no credit. Repeatable to 6 hours. If repeated, a maximum of 1 hour may be counted toward the requirements for the Creative Writing major; a maximum of 3 hours may be counted toward the requirements for the English major.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    ENG 398 - Applied Writing: On-Campus Internship

    (1)
    Professional, on-campus experience employing writing, editing, and other language arts skills. Grading is limited to credit or no credit. Repeatable to 6 hours. If repeated, a maximum of 1 hour may be counted toward the requirements for the Creative Writing major; a maximum of 3 hours may be counted toward the requirements for the English major.

    Prerequisite(s): Enrollment is limited to students with job offers from on-campus entities whose assigned duties meet the stated criteria. See the Department Chair for details.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    ENG 399 - Internship

    (1-3)
    Practical, off-campus experience using writing, editing, and other language arts skills. Grading is limited to credit or no credit.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing Enrollment is limited to students with a signed contract with a company or organization outside of Malone University. See Department Chair for details.

    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    ENG 431 - Advanced Creative Writing Workshop

    (3)
    Advanced writing workshop that presents a single theme or craft issue with common readings while students write in a chosen genre. Repeatable to 6 hours.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 231, 331, 332.

    Offered each Spring.
  
  •  

    ENG 435 - Creative Writing Senior Portfolio

    (2)
    Independent writing project and senior workshop: create new and revise work from earlier courses into a coherent collection, accompanied by a critical introduction. Explore professional and avocational issues such as publishing, graduate school, and writing after college. Culminates in a public reading.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 231, 331, 332, 431.

    Offered each Fall beginning Fall 2013.
  
  •  

    ENG 440 - Advanced Studies in a Literary Period

    (3)
    An intensive study of a literary movement or period, with an emphasis on historical contexts and their significance for literary understanding.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 230, 240, and 6 credits of 300- level literature Repeatable, maximum 6 credits under different subtitles.

    Offered Fall 2014 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    ENG 450 - Advanced Topics

    (1-3)
    Individual or small group study. Open only to junior or senior majors in this area who have completed or are taking regularly scheduled courses.

    Enrollment by permission of the Department Chair.
  
  •  

    ENG 460 - Advanced Studies in Literature

    (3)
    An intensive study of a select literary topic or theme, drawing from a broad spectrum of literary movements or periods. Repeatable, maximum 6 credits under different subtitles.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 230, 240, and 6 credits of 300-level literature.

    Offered Fall 2013 and alternate Fall semesters.
  
  •  

    ENG 472 - Applied Literary Theory

    (3)
    An intensive study of contemporary literary theory and its application to diverse texts ranging in chronology and genre.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 230, 240, and 6 credits of 300-level literature.

    Offered each Spring.

Exercise Science

  
  •  

    EXSC 211 - Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries

    (3)
    The care and prevention of athletic injuries and the physical conditioning of the athlete. Designed for the athletic trainer, the coach, the physical therapist, and the athlete.

    Offered each Fall.
 

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